In anticipation of the snow today, Blount County schools are closed. The ABR Visitor and Education Center will be closed today as well. We will reopen tomorrow at 10 a.m. We hope everyone has a great day and stay safe! ... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

Well everyone there stay safe, warm, dry. It's raining here in Santa Rosa, California. Sure hope the CheeryO's have found a nice n warm n dry den to cuddle up in!! Well everyone enjoy the day off! !😀🐻🐻🐻

Hope all the fur babies are safe out in the woods.

Hope the cheerios are tucked warm in a den.

Y'all stay safe and warm. We're supposed to get our event later this afternoon or evening in Northwest GA.

It’s supposed to start here later this afternoon. Enjoy the day off!

Stay safe and warm -7 here in Northeast Missouri this morning and 2/3 inches of snow on the ground...hope to visit there in late March !!!

Everyone be careful and stay safe and warm

You'll be close tomorrow 2

And warm don’t forget to stay warm!

Stay safe and warm.

Stay warm and safe!

Stay safe!

+ View previous comments

ABR Update-Jan. 15, 2018-Additional ABR Facility Tour Date!

Demand for tickets to our Cupid Cub Facility Tour has been outstanding! We’re opening up a new tour slot on
Friday, February 9, 2018 at 1:00 PM. Please click on the link for more information and to purchase tickets. 😊

appalachianbearrescue.org/event/light-their-way-home-2-3/
... See MoreSee Less

ABR Update-Jan. 15, 2018-Additional ABR Facility Tour Date!

Demand for tickets to our Cupid Cub Facility Tour has been outstanding! We’re opening up a new tour slot on 
Friday, February 9, 2018 at 1:00 PM. Please click on the link for more information and to purchase tickets. 😊

http://appalachianbearrescue.org/event/light-their-way-home-2-3/

Comment on Facebook

Need Help - registered - added a guest - gave all info - it got stuck on "processing transaction" for half an hour. Now, when I logged back in - it says I have a reservation for one and can do nothing about it. HELP! I need to bring Bob - he is my driver.

Registered - stuck on "Processing your transaction" - nothing happening.

Aww, sure wish that I could attend, but live in Santa Rosa, California. Sure sounds like lots of fun, sounds soo interesting! !! Hoping the fundraising is a huge Success!!! 🍇🍏🍎🍈🍒🍐🌲🌲🌲🌲⚘🌾🌿🌱⚘🌲🌲🌲🌲🌲🌲

That’s great! The more people can connect the more they will understand. It’s also a great fund raiser!😊

Sure wish I didn't live over 600 miles away I would be there for sure!!!

Wish I could attend, but am too far away.

What confirmation do we need to bring?

i am so happy to read that the facility fundraising is working out so well.

Can't wait! ❤🐻

Outstanding! Can’t wait!

Oh my, I wish I could come. Grandsons birthday.

Oh I wish you could do one Sat Feb 3!!!

Lucky lucky people

Gayle Minor...???

+ View previous comments

3 days ago

Appalachian Bear Rescue

Curator Janet's report.

Black bears are highly efficient hibernators. When bears begin hibernation, and how long they hibernate, differs between regions and the availability of food. Farther north, the extreme north, bears begin hibernating as early as September or October and may not emerge from their dens until April. Here in Tennessee, bears may wait as late as December to den and may leave the den for short periods during days of warmer weather. Tennessee winters are relatively mild with brief periods of extreme cold often followed by warmer days.

It is a common misconception that bears are true hibernators. Hibernation is when an animal sleeps throughout the winter, dropping their body temperature to match the outside temperature. Black bears enter a period of dormancy referred to as torpor. Unlike true hibernators, while in torpor, a bear can wake up quickly and easily. A bear in a state of torpor lowers their heart rate and respiration, but body temperature remains relatively high. Black bears have an amazing metabolism and endure hibernation without eating, drinking, urinating or defecating. Having eaten more than usual during hyperphagia, bears will use their stored up body fat to live off of without losing any muscle. The bear comes out of hibernation thinner, but still as strong as it was before winter. While mothers are busy with cubs and yearlings in their dens, the males often remain active as our former resident, Apollo, is demonstrating. We’ve had a couple of warm days in the low 60’s recently, but some extremely cold days are in the forecast, so perhaps Apollo will find a warm place to settle down for awhile.

Snow and a very cold night produced some beautiful sights in our area. ABR volunteer, Jeannine Henney, took a picture of dainty snowflakes frozen on a leaf outside of our visitor center this morning. Our bears (and humans), have a stunning, natural home here in the Great Smoky Mountains, with beauty surrounding us in every season.

Our Cupid Cub Event, featuring tours of the ABR Facility, has just a few openings left in the 9AM tour and the 3PM tour. Come see where Apollo recovered! Walk across "Marvin's Creek," and stand underneath "Summitt's Branch." There are also a few seats available in the 9AM, 11AM and 3PM Adult Curator Classes. Please click on the link to find out more and to reserve your spot. appalachianbearrescue.org/event/light-their-way-home-2-3/
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Curator Janets report.

Black bears are highly efficient hibernators.  When bears begin hibernation, and how long they hibernate, differs between regions and the availability of food.  Farther north, the extreme north, bears begin hibernating as early as September or October and may not emerge from their dens until April.   Here in Tennessee, bears may wait as late as December to den and may leave the den for short periods during days of warmer weather.  Tennessee winters are relatively mild with brief periods of extreme cold often followed by warmer days.  

It is a common misconception that bears are true hibernators.  Hibernation is when an animal sleeps throughout the winter, dropping their body temperature to match the outside temperature.  Black bears enter a period of dormancy referred to as torpor.  Unlike true hibernators, while in torpor, a bear can wake up quickly and easily.  A bear in a state of torpor lowers their heart rate and respiration, but body temperature remains relatively high.  Black bears have an amazing metabolism and endure hibernation without eating, drinking, urinating or defecating. Having eaten more than usual during hyperphagia, bears will use their stored up body fat to live off of without losing any muscle.  The bear comes out of hibernation thinner, but still as strong as it was before winter.  While mothers are busy with cubs and yearlings in their dens, the males often remain active as our former resident, Apollo, is demonstrating.  We’ve had a couple of warm days in the low 60’s recently, but some extremely cold days are in the forecast, so perhaps Apollo will find a warm place to settle down for awhile.  

Snow and a very cold night produced some beautiful sights in our area.  ABR volunteer, Jeannine Henney, took a picture of dainty snowflakes frozen on a leaf outside of our visitor center this morning.  Our bears (and humans), have a stunning, natural home here in the Great Smoky Mountains, with beauty surrounding us in every season. 

Our Cupid Cub Event, featuring tours of the ABR Facility, has just a few openings left in the 9AM tour and the 3PM tour. Come see where Apollo recovered! Walk across Marvins Creek, and stand underneath Summitts Branch.  There are also a few seats available in the 9AM, 11AM and 3PM Adult Curator Classes. Please click on the link to find out more and to reserve your spot.  http://appalachianbearrescue.org/event/light-their-way-home-2-3/

Comment on Facebook

Wow, I think I’m actually a bear after reading this. Hyperphagia followed by Torpor. Bingo.

it would be interesting to read an update on Apollo on these much colder days we are having...is he 'napping' for an 'extended' amount of time or still out moving around?

Will you monitor Apollo during the cold and snow? Wasn't he hit by a car? Just want to make sure he can survive on his own. I still think you should have released him with one of the other cubs and let them separate naturally

We had a young bear visit us yesterday, he had a snack of our suet but my husband got the bird feeder while he was enjoying the suet. We live in an area where we see bears fairly frequently and this one had no ear tags or a collar, he appeared to be about two years old and looked really good. It was a delight to see him in good shape and odd to see one in January, every time I see one I wonder about Bonnie Blue and Ridgeway as they came back to this area. Wish him well and hope he has moved on to a little less human populated area. ABR restores my faith in humans and Thank-you for all you do!

Thank You Curator Janet for the report, very interesting to know that....I keep thinking about all the bears that have been released and the thought of all that snow 🙁 will they still be able to find food under all the snow?

Thanks for the photo credit. 🐻

Will we be allowed to take photographs on the tour of the facility? Didn't know if I should plan to bring my camera. Thanks so much for this opportunity! 😀

I love learning the "Bear Facts" Curator Janet. Thanks for taking the time to teach all your loyal fans!!

I was a bear fan before I found your site - now I'm a semi-knowledgeable bear fan ❣ thank you for all you do !

Always teaching and entertaining us... thanks!

Thank you for sharing the pictures and updates! I hope Apollo finds his warm bed in this cold weather!

Thank you ABR, I have learnt so much bear husbandry since I found you. Thank you so much for your interesting and informative and invariably funny posts that keep your followers enthralled.

How beautiful those snowflakes are and I just picture that bear playing in the snow.

Love the updates on Apollo and the great information about bear ‘hibernation’/torpor.

Black bears are so fascinating!!

Thank you for always teaching us. We will now put the bird feeders out only on the coldest of days (like today - but we are guarding them carefully - Mr. Bear comes back he will be spoken to sternly).

Thank you for sharing educational information. I enjoy learning more about the black bears in NC and Tennessee. I feel like the bears are ours even though they roam wherever they need to go.

I am learning so much, thank you!

Wish I lived closer, I would love to come.

Good information to have.

Thank you Curator Janet for another informative post.

Maybe the next one I can attend. 😢

Just so you know, at this very minute in Middle Tennessee we have bright, really bright, sunshine. Hang on.

Love the updates. May try to attend the event.

<3

+ View previous comments

ABR Update-January 12, 2018- Apollo Report: Still awake.

Apollo Bear, released on December 4, 2017, was the only one of The Cheery-O’s who left ABR with a GPS collar. Curator Coy and the vets of UT’s College of Veterinary Medicine thought following Apollo would provide valuable information on how well he copes following the surgery to repair his broken leg. As you recall, that little bear was up and down trees in the Wild Enclosure as if nothing had happened, matching Otto and Rollo, climb-for-climb. Coy reports Mr. Apollo has elected not to hibernate yet. We continue to receive reports of male bears still up and about, so he’s not alone in his decision to stay up late. Bears in our area don’t usually hibernate until late December and male bears may not hibernate at all. There’s an abundance of acorns still on the ground, and some of the local bruins are choosing to snack rather than snooze. Apollo isn’t roaming far from his release site, so he’s finding what he needs close to home.

Our Cupid Cub Event, featuring tours of the ABR Facility, has just a few openings left in the 9AM tour and the 3PM tour. Come see where Apollo recovered! Meet Sister Bunny and Charley! See the Cubby Pool, home of The Monster Frog! There are also a few seats available in the 9AM, 11AM and 3PM Adult Curator Classes. Please click on the link to find out more and to reserve your spot.

appalachianbearrescue.org/event/light-their-way-home-2-3/
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ABR Update-January 12, 2018- Apollo Report: Still awake.

Apollo Bear, released on December 4, 2017, was the only one of The Cheery-O’s who left ABR with a GPS collar. Curator Coy and the vets of UT’s College of Veterinary Medicine thought following Apollo would provide valuable information on how well he copes following the surgery to repair his broken leg. As you recall, that little bear was up and down trees in the Wild Enclosure as if nothing had happened, matching Otto and Rollo, climb-for-climb. Coy reports Mr. Apollo has elected not to hibernate yet. We continue to receive reports of male bears still up and about, so he’s not alone in his decision to stay up late. Bears in our area don’t usually hibernate until late December and male bears may not hibernate at all. There’s an abundance of acorns still on the ground, and some of the local bruins are choosing to snack rather than snooze. Apollo isn’t roaming far from his release site, so he’s finding what he needs close to home. 

Our Cupid Cub Event, featuring tours of the ABR Facility, has just a few openings left in the 9AM tour and the 3PM tour.  Come see where Apollo recovered! Meet Sister Bunny and Charley! See the Cubby Pool, home of The Monster Frog! There are also a few seats available in the 9AM, 11AM and 3PM Adult Curator Classes. Please click on the link to find out more and to reserve your spot. 

http://appalachianbearrescue.org/event/light-their-way-home-2-3/

Comment on Facebook

I am so stupid. I look at this bear and I just want to run over there and hug him. So hard for me to realize that he would hurt me. Doesn't he just look like the sweetest most cuddly bear that ever was. Look at that face.

A big bear, who either chose not to hibernate or woke up after it got warm, raided our bird feeders when we left them out after dark last night. We watched him from 10 feet away in the house, lick up all the seed and nuts and he watched us. We are not happy with bears at our house right now.

Thank you for the update on Apollo! I hope he'll find a warm den or at least a warm place out ot the cold weather.

🤗Thank you so much for Apollo's update! It's really interesting to learn that he's still awake, considering that he and the other Cheery-O's were so sleepy during their last weeks at ABR. Is it possible that Apollo isn't sleeping because he is on heightened alert now? After all, he's basically out of his comfort ABR zone and maybe just a little nervous/anxious about his new surroundings?

Why do the male bears not choose to hibernate?? Are the females hibernating and birthing these Cubs during this time??

Sent a small check late December n just sent another donation. Ty for all u do

Wow, he’s close to ABR this could be wonderful or bad but so happy he’s doing what he does best - eat and climb.

O TY for the wonderful update on Apollo... He is such a sweet rescue bear, and he may feel more secure close to his release spot... I wonder if Otto or Rollo is nearby?

Apollo has been my favorite. Maybe because my great grandson is named Apollo. I was hoping he would be all cozy for the winter. Stay safe little guy. 💕

Thank you for the Apollo report. Isn’t he beautiful! I’ve gotten over wanting to hug bears after seeing a picture of 2 little ones with all their claws in sight. They are well armed . This cold may put this bear to bed. Maybe we’ll learn more.

It's wonderful to actually find out what Apollo has been doing since his release. I'm so happy that he is still doing well and acting like a big bear. 💖

I'm so glad to have updates. Sure miss them not being there with daily pictures and their activities or lack of😊 but they need to be free!

Thank you sooo very much for the Update on Apollo Bear! Glad to know he's doing Well guess Apollo Bear has chosen for now to stay awake, and to keep on eating for now.And it's great to know he's staying close to where he was released, and that he's doing good!Ooh Apollo Bear your one georgeous, handsome Bear, please keep us updated on Apollo Bear when possible. Thank you soo much for the interesting Update on Apollo Bear! 😀🐻🌲🌲🌲🌾🌿🍇🍏🍎🍈🍒🌰🌰🌲🌲🌲🌲

Thank you so much for your update on Apollo. I have been thinking about him so much lately and was hoping for an update. Can't wait for the tour. I've got my reservation, so excited!

I love this picture of Apollo. He's such a beautiful bear. I hope he continues find food for a very, very long time and life in the wild is good to him. I'm so glad that Curator Coy put the GPS collar on him and we can know that he is doing just fine. I always worry about them after their releases.

I’m “Beary” happy to hear he is doing well. How is the abundant acorn supply going to impact the number of cubs born in 2018? Or will it? Could you all possibly do a post on this. My understanding is the fertilized eggs lie dormant depending on the health of the mom.

Oh so happy to have update on Apollo. What a wonderful surprise! Maybe he feels lost and alone, may take awhile for him and the others to adjust to their freedom. Thanks so much for informing us he is well. Pray these little guys stay safe and find plenty to eat. Spring will be here soon!

Glad he is dong ok - moving and finding enough food. Guess his body will tell him when/if it is time to hibernate.

So great to hear something about Apollo, glad to hear he has stayed in the general area of his release so maybe he will stay safe there instead of doing a lot of roaming and maybe running into other male bears.

Aw, Apollo bear!! Such a little trooper. Healed up fast and became one of the three CheeriOs!! May the Force be with you, and all the rescues at ABR.

What a relief to know Apollo is ok,came to you such a poor little cub and grew up big and beautiful..so hope he'll find his way in life and live long and happy..xx

Thank you for the news of Apollo,,hope he's doing well and will get some snooze time in soon..I hope all rage released bears are safe and doing well,,,Otto and Rollo!

Oh baby bear, Apollo, your birthday is coming up on the 22nd, I pray you are safe. I hope you are not lonely and looking for Otto and Rollo. Stay safe and get your nap so you will be all ready for Spring. ♥️🐻♥️I miss hearing about your daily antics.

So glad Apollo is doing well, eating and just taking it easy. Hoping that his pals he met at ABR are doing as well. Prayers that all will go on to live a long life and pass on their DNA to many cubs!!

thank you curator coy for the very happy report on apollo bear. he's such a handsome fellow. good news is always a blessing!

+ View previous comments

5 days ago

Appalachian Bear Rescue

We’re grateful for your exceptional response to our Cupid Cub Event on February 10, 2018! There are a few spaces left for the 9am and 3pm ABR Bear Facility tours and a very limited number of openings in the 9am, 11am and 3pm Curator classes. We also want to remind those visiting there aren’t many restaurants open in Townsend at this time of year, so please be sure to reserve your spot for the Pasta Dinner at Miss.Lily’s Cafe. She is opening the cafe just for the Cupid Cub Event and tickets are selling fast! Please be sure to register for any of these opportunities at the following link:

appalachianbearrescue.org/event/light-their-way-home-2-3/

As you know, we received a generous grant from Lush Cosmetics #charitypot to be used to add cameras to areas of the ABR Facility. We can stretch those dollars by doing much of the non-technical work utilizing our in-house talent: Curators Coy and David, Board member Ed Owens and ABR volunteer Don Welch. Even the arrows returned from their vacation to contribute their pointing skills to the project.
We know from experience we’ll get better quality and more reliable feed from the cameras if we use dedicated cable rather than rely on wifi feed. The gentlemen of ABR used much ingenuity, muscle and energy to plan a path for the cable from the Wild Enclosures to the ABR office, dig the trench, thread the cable through conduit and bury it all. We hope the technical work we can’t do will commence soon. If all goes well, our curators will be able to observe our resident bears remotely and with more frequency than ever before.
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We’re grateful for your exceptional response to our Cupid Cub Event on February 10, 2018! There are a few spaces left for the 9am and 3pm ABR Bear Facility tours and a very limited number of openings in the 9am, 11am and 3pm Curator classes. We also want to remind those visiting there aren’t many restaurants open in Townsend at this time of year, so please be sure to reserve your spot for the Pasta Dinner at Miss.Lily’s Cafe. She is opening the cafe just for the Cupid Cub Event and tickets are selling fast!  Please be sure to register for any of these opportunities at the following link:

http://appalachianbearrescue.org/event/light-their-way-home-2-3/

As you know, we received a generous grant from Lush Cosmetics #charitypot to be used to add cameras to areas of the ABR Facility. We can stretch those dollars by doing much of the non-technical work utilizing our in-house talent: Curators Coy and David, Board member Ed Owens and ABR volunteer Don Welch. Even the arrows returned from their vacation to contribute their pointing skills to the project. 
We know from experience we’ll get better quality and more reliable feed from the cameras if we use dedicated cable rather than rely on wifi feed. The gentlemen of ABR used much ingenuity, muscle and energy to plan a path for the cable from the Wild Enclosures to the ABR office, dig the trench, thread the cable through conduit and bury it all. We hope the technical work we can’t do will commence soon. If all goes well, our curators will be able to observe our resident bears remotely and with more frequency than ever before.

Comment on Facebook

Darn it!! Wished I didn't live so far away...

thanks for update, you guys certainly work hard no matter what time of year. Glad Arrows has returned from vacation!

I see the arrows came back from vacation safely and looking refreshed

Thank you, Miss Lily's Cafe. Excited about the cameras and video.

Thanks for sharing the latest updates of activities taking place at ABR and the photos.

Sure wish that I could attend, but live in California, that's too far, but hoping this is a very successful day for ABR! !!! 😀😀🐻🐻🐻

I am so impressed with the skills and knowledge that Curators Coy and David, Ed and Don have so that they were able to lay the cable thus reducing installation costs. I also admire them for their commitment to doing this labour-intensive work. Thanks guys!

Thank you Lush and the volunteers and curators for everything you do for the bears.

Yay!! I am in for the 11am class & the 3pm tour. So jazzed!! 🙂

Sounds awesome. Thank you Lush Cosmetics and the awesome fellows at ABR. 💕

Thank you ABR folks for your hard work on the trench and cables!

That's a lot of digging on really hard, cold soil!

I hope you do this again next year cuz i cannot attend this year... boohoo..

Thank you for the great update!!! ❤️🐻🐻🐻🐻🐻🙏🏼

Happy New Year to all the arrows!

Looks like it is coming along great.

Do you mean January 10, 2018 or February 10, 2017?

Such great news!!!

I went last year and loved the tour.

Awesome!

Awesome work👍🏼

+ View previous comments

6 days ago

Appalachian Bear Rescue

On Saturday, February 10th, 2018, Appalachian Bear Rescue will host tours of the ABR Bear Facility! Start times will be 9:00 a.m., 11:00 a.m., 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. Please allow two hours for each tour and plan to arrive at the ABR Visitor and Education Center at Trillium Cove Shopping Center (121 Painted Trillium Way) 15 minutes prior to your tour start time. Tours are available for a $25 donation per person. (If the Saturday tours sell out, we'll open tours on Friday, February 9th in the same time slots.)

Saturday, February 10th, 2018: Curator Janet Dalton will teach four sessions of the adult version of our Junior Curator class. Classes will be offered at 9:00 a.m., 11:00 a.m., 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. Learn how ABR Curators receive a bear from wildlife officials, how to record a bear’s vital statistics, how to ear-tag and PIT tag a bear, and how a Curator builds a plan of treatment for an injured or orphaned cub. Classes are available for a $10 donation per person. ABR Members receive free registration for these classes. For more information about ABR Membership, please visit our website at www.AppalachianBearRescue.org. Membership will allow you the opportunity to attend a year’s worth of educational programming for free!

Saturday, February 10th, 2018: Miss Lily’s Café in Townsend will offer a Cupid Cub pasta dinner at the Café at 6:00 p.m. Tickets for the Cupid Cub Dinner are available for $25 per person. Dinner will include a pasta entrée, salad, bread, dessert and tea or coffee. Beer is available for purchase at Miss Lily’s Café. You are welcome to bring your own bottle of wine.

While you are in Townsend, please plan to visit our ABR friends at Cades Cove Cellars winery. Cades Cove Cellars will host a Valentine Market on Saturday, February 10th. ABR Tour participants will receive a discount on bottles of wine purchased that day. Bring our wonderful local wine to your Cupid Cub Dinner. Save a Bear Cub and support our local business partners!

Please click on the link to purchase tickets to tours, classes and dinner.

appalachianbearrescue.org/event/light-their-way-home-2-3/

*PLEASE NOTE: If ABR receives a bear cub prior to the tour weekend, facility tours will be canceled. Only Curators are allowed at the bear facility when bears are in residence. All other education opportunities, the Cupid Cub Dinner, and the Cades Cove Cellars Valentine Market will continue as planned.

Cupid Cub Event-Tours, Classes, DinnerFeb 10, 9:00amAppalachian Bear RescueOn Saturday, February 10th, 2018, Appalachian Bear Rescue will host tours of the ABR Bear Facility! Start times will be 9:00 a.m., 11:00 a.m., 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. Please allow two hours for each tour and plan to arrive at the ABR Visitor and Education Center at Trillium Cove Shopping Center (121 Painted Trillium Way) 15 minutes prior to your tour start time. Tours are available for a $25 donation per person. (If the Saturday tours sell out, we'll open tours on Friday, February 9th in the same time slots.)

Saturday, February 10th, 2018: Curator Janet Dalton will teach four sessions of the adult version of our Junior Curator class. Classes will be offered at 9:00 a.m., 11:00 a.m., 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. Learn how ABR Curators receive a bear from wildlife officials, how to record a bear’s vital statistics, how to ear-tag and PIT tag a bear, and how a Curator builds a plan of treatment for an injured or orphaned cub. Classes are available for a $10 donation per person. ABR Members receive free registration for these classes. For more information about ABR Membership, please visit our website at www.AppalachianBearRescue.org. Membership will allow you the opportunity to attend a year’s worth of educational programming for free!

Saturday, February 10th, 2018: Miss Lily’s Café in Townsend will offer a Cupid Cub pasta dinner at the Café at 6:00 p.m. Tickets for the Cupid Cub Dinner are available for $25 per person. Dinner will include a pasta entrée, salad, bread, dessert and tea or coffee. Beer is available for purchase at Miss Lily’s Café. You are welcome to bring your own bottle of wine.

While you are in Townsend, please plan to visit our ABR friends at Cades Cove Cellars winery. Cades Cove Cellars will host a Valentine Market on Saturday, February 10th. ABR Tour participants will receive a discount on bottles of wine purchased that day. Bring our wonderful local wine to your Cupid Cub Dinner. Save a Bear Cub and support our local business partners!

Please click on the link to purchase tickets to tours, classes and dinner.

appalachianbearrescue.org/event/light-their-way-home-2-3/

*PLEASE NOTE: If ABR receives a bear cub prior to the tour weekend, facility tours will be canceled. Only Curators are allowed at the bear facility when bears are in residence. All other education opportunities, the Cupid Cub Dinner, and the Cades Cove Cellars Valentine Market will continue as planned.
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Cupid Cub Event-Tours, Classes, Dinner

Comment on Facebook

Waiting for confirmation! Itchy finger was working fine at high noon! Can’t wait!

What is the difference between the class and tour?

We can’t make it Saturday due to husband working. When will we know about Friday? We could do that day!

Rachel Cameron

Got my confirmation. Can't wait!!!

YAYYY! I have my spot reserved! I'm so excited! I may even try a Mazzouri Bear pellet when I get there. 😜🐻

I am on a wait list for Sat. 11am. Now worried I won't get a spot 🙁 Hoping Sat. fills up & I'll get a Friday spot 🙂 I can go anytime on Fri, but was limited for Sat. Fingers crossed!!!

I’m in like Flynn at 9:00! Woo hoo!!!!

❤️

Have fun, people, and share with us about your wonderful experience.

All signed up. Can't wait!!❤🐻💚

All signed up too, so happy we can join this year 🐻

I...AM...SO...STOKED!!!! See y'all in a month!

Spots reserved, we’re going, can’t wait!

Got signed up--so excited-- been an ABR supporter for several years, and can't wait to see where our cubbies stay!~

Wish I could.

Woohoo! Going on the 3 pm tour!

ah wish I could be there!

Enjoy 🐻💕♥️

Is it normal to see black bears in Naples, Florida? nbc4i.com/2018/01/11/man-survives-after-bear-attacks-him-during-dog-walk/

Ok, yesterday I was on the 11am tour wait list & today I am in for the 11am class & the 3pm tour! I was able to re-schedule Sat. plans so that I could do this. So excited for this opportunity!!!! ABR you can take me off that wait list 🙂

+ View previous comments

1 week ago

Appalachian Bear Rescue

"I am posting today to provide an update to my post last week. Last Wednesday, I set out to help a fellow colleague locate some GPS collars in the backcountry. It is important to note that researchers evaluate the need to retrieve GPS collars at any time. Sometimes they are slipped off by the animal prematurely, and other times they are programmed to drop off on their own. However, there are times collars are dropped remotely from active wildlife. This can be done manually with a special transmitter. In the process of remotely dropping a collar we found the bear den pictured. The bear was not there, but its collar was left behind after the drop command was transmitted. I wanted to share it with you all because, in my opinion, this is probably the coolest bear den I have seen yet. It was excavated on the side of a slope and included a 'roof' and a large nest made of rhododendron leaves and branches inside. The den was very roomy (was built by a large, male black bear) and had exits from two sides. We were not worried that the male bear left his den as many other males are doing the same thing right now (still quite a bit of food on the ground; temperature fluctuations). Hopefully, he goes back to his hillside mansion, but he can quickly build another one if he desires. Had we been attempting to go to the den of an adult female, our procedures would have been different so as not to disturb her potential litter of cubs. Researchers never want to accidentally facilitate cub orphaning so much attention is given in that regard. It was time, however, for the male to give his GPS necklace back, and I’m sure he is doing just fine!
I would like to thank all of our supporters for helping provide assistance for ABR to rehabilitate, release, and research the American black bear. From monetary donations to sending supplies from our Amazon Wish List, you all are the heart and soul of ABR’s multifaceted mission and help us ensure we are doing the very best job we can. I have also included some pictures of items that were purchased by you that we use all of the time just as I did last week. Thank you!"

Appalachian Bear Rescue’s Cupid Cub Event will feature tours of the ABR Bear Facility on Saturday, February 10th. Tour start times will be 9:00 a.m., 11:00 a.m., 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. Please allow two hours for each tour and plan to arrive at the ABR Visitor and Education Center at Trillium Cove Shopping Center (121 Painted Trillium Way) 15 minutes prior to your tour start time. Tours are available for a $25 donation per person. If the Saturday tours sell out, we will open tours on Friday, February 9th in the same time slots.

The Cupid Cub Event will also include opportunities for some bear education. Curator Janet Dalton will teach four sessions of the adult version of our Junior Curator class. Classes will be offered at 9:00 a.m., 11:00 a.m., 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. Learn how ABR Curators receive a bear from wildlife officials, how to record a bear’s vital statistics, how to ear-tag and PIT tag a bear, and how a Curator builds a plan of treatment for an injured or orphaned cub. Classes are available for a $10 donation per person. ABR Members receive free registration for these classes. For more information about ABR Membership, please visit our website at www.AppalachianBearRescue.org. Membership will allow you the opportunity to attend a year’s worth of educational programming for free!

ABR is partnered with Miss Lily’s Café in Townsend to offer a Cupid Cub pasta dinner at the Café at 6:00 p.m. on Saturday, February 10th. Tickets for the Cupid Cub Dinner are available on the ABR website for $25 per person. Dinner will include a pasta entrée, salad, bread, dessert and tea or coffee. Beer is available for purchase at Miss Lily’s Café. You are welcome to bring your own bottle of wine.

Event tickets go on sale Wednesday January 10, 2018 at noon (EST). We’ll post the link tomorrow.
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I am posting today to provide an update to my post last week.  Last Wednesday, I set out to help a fellow colleague locate some GPS collars in the backcountry.  It is important to note that researchers evaluate the need to retrieve GPS collars at any time.  Sometimes they are slipped off by the animal prematurely, and other times they are programmed to drop off on their own.  However, there are times collars are dropped remotely from active wildlife.  This can be done manually with a special transmitter. In the process of remotely dropping a collar we found the bear den pictured.  The bear was not there, but its collar was left behind after the drop command was transmitted.  I wanted to share it with you all because, in my opinion, this is probably the coolest bear den I have seen yet.  It was excavated on the side of a slope and included a roof and a large nest made of rhododendron leaves and branches inside.  The den was very roomy (was built by a large, male black bear) and had exits from two sides.  We were not worried that the male bear left his den as many other males are doing the same thing right now (still quite a bit of food on the ground; temperature fluctuations).  Hopefully, he goes back to his hillside mansion, but he can quickly build another one if he desires.  Had we been attempting to go to the den of an adult female, our procedures would have been different so as not to disturb her potential litter of cubs.  Researchers never want to accidentally facilitate cub orphaning so much attention is given in that regard.  It was time, however, for the male to give his GPS necklace back, and I’m sure he is doing just fine!
I would like to thank all of our supporters for helping provide assistance for ABR to rehabilitate, release, and research the American black bear.  From monetary donations to sending supplies from our Amazon Wish List, you all are the heart and soul of ABR’s multifaceted mission and help us ensure we are doing the very best job we can.  I have also included some pictures of items that were purchased by you that we use all of the time just as I did last week.  Thank you!

Appalachian Bear Rescue’s Cupid Cub Event will feature tours of the ABR Bear Facility on Saturday, February 10th.  Tour start times will be 9:00 a.m., 11:00 a.m., 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m.  Please allow two hours for each tour and plan to arrive at the ABR Visitor and Education Center at Trillium Cove Shopping Center (121 Painted Trillium Way) 15 minutes prior to your tour start time.  Tours are available for a $25 donation per person.  If the Saturday tours sell out, we will open tours on Friday, February 9th in the same time slots.

The Cupid Cub Event will also include opportunities for some bear education. Curator Janet Dalton will teach four sessions of the adult version of our Junior Curator class.  Classes will be offered at 9:00 a.m., 11:00 a.m., 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m.  Learn how ABR Curators receive a bear from wildlife officials, how to record a bear’s vital statistics, how to ear-tag and PIT tag a bear, and how a Curator builds a plan of treatment for an injured or orphaned cub.  Classes are available for a $10 donation per person.  ABR Members receive free registration for these classes.  For more information about ABR Membership, please visit our website at www.AppalachianBearRescue.org.  Membership will allow you the opportunity to attend a year’s worth of educational programming for free!

ABR is partnered with Miss Lily’s Café in Townsend to offer a Cupid Cub pasta dinner at the Café at 6:00 p.m. on Saturday, February 10th.  Tickets for the Cupid Cub Dinner are available on the ABR website for $25 per person.  Dinner will include a pasta entrée, salad, bread, dessert and tea or coffee.  Beer is available for purchase at Miss Lily’s Café.  You are welcome to bring your own bottle of wine.

Event tickets go on sale Wednesday January 10, 2018 at noon (EST). We’ll post the link tomorrow.

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ABR, I hang on to every single word that you write. It is like being in my favorite science/biology classroom all over again. Thank you for sharing your findings with all of us. Knowlege is a powerful tool. The knowledge you have gained, in addition to your commitment to a most worthy cause, makes it possible for you to return rescued cubbies right back where they belong - in the wild. We thank you for that. Blessed be.

A large male bear? Could it be our Milo??

Just curious, when will Coys study be released? I so appreciate all that you guys do for the bears. I have learned a whole lot about bears since I have been following you. I have always loved bears and I have always had a healthy respect for them. Though I would love to snuggle with one, I know that can only happen in my dreams! I just get to admire them through the eyes of professional photographers and sites like yours. So I thank you from the bottom of my heart for all the information, pictures, the stories and commentaries!

It will be fun to find out which of the big boys made that den! Thanks Coy for going in and giving us a good idea of just how big the den is. Today was a holiday day in my rehab world. Anthony Chitwood and I released a screech owl that he brought in a few weeks ago. She was a car hit. As always the best part of rehab is the release! Be careful out there😊

Glad to know you don't want to disturb a female bear's den.

Wow so fascinating, Bear are so intelligent they are engineers! Thank you so much for sharing the pictures! Curator Coy you have the best job ever! Such a awesome den, will the bear know you were there and will they stay there after he smells you scent ? 🐻♥️🙏

Can you tell us which bear the collar belonged to? We promise we won't tell...

That is some home he built. Are you able to tell us which chubby cubby this was? Do you know how are little Cheery-o's are doing?

Will the scent of a human deter a bear from using this den?

Wow could it be one of the ABR bears?? He needs to hire out his services, beautiful den with escape,roomy bedroom and warm bedding available.

Do viewers at home know the bear in question? Or is that a secret?

Love all the info...looking forward to hearing (if you can tell) who made this palatial palace’

Those boys better watch out in the outback. One of these days, one of those ole recused cubbies gonna mistake youins for a meal! Just joking!

Thanks to you and your group for your care of these wild ones.

Enjoyed reading your article, very informative and educational.

That was a great den, thanks for showing us Curator Coy, and also for the photos of items donated from the Amazon Wish List. 🙂

Have seen similar dens near our lake house and we give them a wide berth, especially since we have had a bobcat den very near our home after nearly a year after not going there regularly.

Great pictures Thanks Coy for sharing!

Great pictures of Coy and the den! Thank you for sharing and for all the hard work that you do to help our precious little bears!

Beautiful home! Just amazing to us how extremely clever the bears are. Thank you ABR for educating us.

Oh well, you always think it could be one of the former residents. Smart bear.

Wow what a great bear den!! I hope the Cheery-O’s have such a den!🐻🐻🐻

Thanks for sharing this interesting information.

Great story and den pictures

Quite a palace, I'm sure, in the world of bears!

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ABR Update-January 8, 2018

In 2017, we had a fantastic response to our first public tours of the Appalachian Bear Rescue facility. We’re offering them again on Saturday, February 10th, 2018! Tour start times will be 9:00 a.m., 11:00 a.m., 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. Please allow two hours for each tour and plan to arrive at the ABR Visitor and Education Center at Trillium Cove Shopping Center (121 Painted Trillium Way) 15 minutes prior to your tour start time. Tours are available for a $25 donation per person. If the Saturday tours sell out, we will open tours on Friday, February 9th in the same time slots. There are a number of other events planned for the day.

Please Note: If ABR receives a bear cub prior to the tour weekend, facility tours will be canceled. Only Curators are allowed at the bear facility when bears are in residence. All other education opportunities and events planned for the tour day will continue as planned.

We’ll post details and the link for tickets when they go on sale on Wednesday, January 10, 2018.
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ABR Update-January 8, 2018

In 2017, we had a fantastic response to our first public tours of the Appalachian Bear Rescue facility. We’re offering them again on Saturday, February 10th, 2018! Tour start times will be 9:00 a.m., 11:00 a.m., 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. Please allow two hours for each tour and plan to arrive at the ABR Visitor and Education Center at Trillium Cove Shopping Center (121 Painted Trillium Way) 15 minutes prior to your tour start time. Tours are available for a $25 donation per person. If the Saturday tours sell out, we will open tours on Friday, February 9th in the same time slots.  There are a number of other events planned for the day. 

Please Note: If ABR receives a bear cub prior to the tour weekend, facility tours will be canceled. Only Curators are allowed at the bear facility when bears are in residence. All other education opportunities and events planned for the tour day will continue as planned.

We’ll post details and the link for tickets when they go on sale on Wednesday, January 10, 2018.

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I would love to take this tour. Fun for those that live nearby. 😊

Are there any openings for Saturday for two?

Retirement is grand! I think we can actually come this year, if I'm lucky enough to get in on the tickets. *fingers crossed*

Ican'twaitIcan'twaitIcan'twaitIcan'twaitIcan'twait!!!!!!!!!!!!

Awww...I wish you were offering this the middle of February😩

This is a great way to raise funds, for the facility.

So excited I can’t wait for the tix to go on sale!

wish i could go. would love to see "that other bear's" stump. here's to hoping that the facility remains empty for those tours. all good little bears need to be sound asleep!

It's a great tour , we recommend it for everyone, they were very accommodating even for a old crippled guy like me.

Fingers crossed I can access the website & purchase a ticket with this phone. No wi-fi but evidently there is enough floating around to let me FB most of the time 🙂 Live nearby & would so love to go

Congratulations! ABR is blessed with success in all endeavors. Thanks a million!!!!

What time will tickets go on sale on Wednesday and are they being sold through the online store?

I highly recommend this event! My family and I thoroughly enjoyed touring the facility. We learned so much! 👏🏻

Hoping I’m lucky enough to get a ticket and drive up from Charlotte, N.C.!

Do you suppose that all bears are hibernating by now? I am thinking that the cold spell probably sent any holdouts into their dens.

Aww sure wish that I could attend, but I live in Santa Rosa, California! Tooo far! Soo hoping that there will be a huge turnout for these Public Tours, sounds fantastic! !! 😀🐻🐻🐻💙💖💚💛

If I were closer, I would be there in an instant!

My reservation finger is getting itchy!!!😳😜💜

I wish I could come.

This would be awesome, but as said before I live in Florida darn it 🙁 , hope everyone that goes has a fantastic time..

Kim McCall, tell your mom about these tours.

Lucky, lucky people. Wish I was there too, but I am glad they made it. Thank you for sharing.

👍What a wonderful opportunity for folks who are able to attend! Last year's photos and reports were terrific.

What time is the link going to get out up

Checking husband work schedule!! I wanna come!

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1 week ago

Appalachian Bear Rescue

Curator Janet's report.

In early June of 2013, TWRA officers received a call about a mother with 5 cubs who was hanging around a heavily populated tourist area and getting into trouble. After multiple attempts to encourage the mother to move on with her cubs, the decision was made to relocate the family. Capturing one bear can be challenging, but capturing a mother with five cubs is nearly impossible. The mother and three of her cubs were easily captured, but the remaining two were wily and managed to dodge every attempt at capture. The mother and captured cubs were held briefly, but time was running out. The family could not be held any longer as mom had already been struggling to feed her large family. They were relocated in a remote area far away from humans while the officers continued to search for the remaining two. Eventually, they were captured; a male weighing 12 lbs. and a cinnamon colored female weighing <10 lbs. The cubs were stressed and hungry and were brought to ABR. Annie and Oscar were placed in a perimeter pen that was adjacent to Boston Bear who heard their sad cries and responded with soft grunts.

Annie was smaller than her brother, and more passive in her behavior. She appeared to have been struggling for a long time, and coming from a large litter, she had likely not been able to get enough to eat from her mother. The first 24 hours of observation was disturbing. Oscar was preventing his sister from eating and Annie quietly resigned herself to the situation, an indication that she was used to this behavior. Oscar was not a cruel bear; he didn’t know that food at ABR would be plentiful. He had been accustomed to competing with his other siblings for a place at mom’s table, and judging from his small size, he had likely been struggling as much as his sister. It became apparent that the two would need to be separated in order for Annie to thrive. After a temporary move to the nursery to help Annie get rehydrated and gain some weight, the decision was made to move her in the pen with gentle Boston rather than place her back with her brother. Immediately, Boston displayed his intelligence and gentleness by touching noses with her and offering her grapes. Boston was never aggressive toward her, even modifying his play to suit her needs. It didn’t take Annie long to warm up to Boston. As she gained strength and confidence, she and Boston were moved to an acclimation pen where Oscar joined them. When Oscar tried to steal her honeycomb treat, curators watched with amusement as the new and improved Annie defended it and took it from him. Accustomed to having plenty to eat, Oscar moved on to choose another treat. His time away from Annie had calmed him. Food at ABR is plentiful, so he could eat as much as he wanted without feeling threatened by his sibling. Boston, Annie, and Oscar bonded and were nicknamed the “Tennessee Trio.” The three soon joined the rambunctious South Carolina cubs (Bennie, Jerry, and Carrie) in the wild enclosure and held their own. By the end of August, all six cubs had bonded and were frequently observed hanging out in the same tree.

Annie and Oscar were released on October 24, 2013 with Oscar weighing 73 lbs. and Annie weighing 56.5 lbs. They will turn five years old later this month. Annie and Oscar were given a second chance and were part of another ABR success story.

Tickets for upcoming tours of our facility will go on sale next week. Continue to watch this page for information.
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Curator Janets report.

In early June of 2013, TWRA officers received a call about a mother with 5 cubs who was hanging around a heavily populated tourist area and getting into trouble.  After multiple attempts to encourage the mother to move on with her cubs, the decision was made to relocate the family.  Capturing one bear can be challenging, but capturing a mother with five cubs is nearly impossible.  The mother and three of her cubs were easily captured, but the remaining two were wily and managed to dodge every attempt at capture.  The mother and captured cubs were held briefly, but time was running out.   The family could not be held any longer as mom had already been struggling to feed her large family.  They were relocated in a remote area far away from humans while the officers continued to search for the remaining two.  Eventually, they were captured; a male weighing 12 lbs. and a cinnamon colored female weighing

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I'm really enjoying reading about and seeing photos of cubs that were at ABR before I found your site!

I am definitely sending a donation. Your organization does wonderful work for these precious bear cubs. So amazing.

I had never heard of a bear having that large of a litter. Mama bear certainly had her paws full trying to provide for her huge family!!

Curator Janet, thank you for this wonderful story and the pictures. It's not a wonder that Boston Bear was your favorite. I hope they are all doing well. Thank you for all you do for these precious bears.

I am really loving these memories from the times before I started following ABR. Helps me connect to the bears that came before Carter, Marvin, Bonnie Blue, Ridgeway and Woody. Thanks, Curator Janet!

Such a sweet story! I'm glad that Oscar and Annie didn't get captured with mom. Splitting them up not only gave them a chance to survive, it probably put less stress on mom to provide for the 3 she had. Hopefully, they all made it.

What a wonderful heartwarming story,great photo's of the beautiful little cubs,and the way in which you treat them to grow into cubs ready for their new life in the wild,with those photo's and your stories you really could make little individual pamphlets for your visitors to read,of the different cubs and their lives with you;because i know I'm not the only one who loves to read your stories and see your photo's...looking forward to more stories. ❤❤

Thank you for the lovely ending. I'm sure I would have fallen in ♡ with them. The pictures are wonderful as always. I hope Annie managed to find many good helpings of honeycomb in the wild.

How comforting to know Oscar mellowed out and no longer could prevent his sibling from eating (and she held her own!!) Thank you for sharing Curator Janet !!❤️

Oscar and Annie were both gorgeous but Annie had the most stunning eyes. I hope they are both doing well and thriving.

This is so interesting. I’m sure Momma bear cried for her 2 lost babies but then she was better able to feed her tensing babes. It would be wonderful if she knew that her babies were safe and sound. Thanks for this.

Appalachian Bear Rescue I think Boston Bear would make a wonderful character for a children's book! Maybe you could have a writing contest. Participants could choose a cub and write a short story about him/her and the winners could be combined into a book that ABR could then sell or raffle off to raise money....or maybe sell each short story separately. The writers could maybe get some memento from Trillium Cove for their efforts, ABR could get needed money for the cubs and the facility and the public gets a chance to "meet" these wonderful bears.

In my mind ABR saved a sow and five cubs. What a wonderful, successful story. Thank you for all you did and continue to do, and for sharing the story of past residents.

Thanks so much for sharing this story! This was before I found out about ABR. Love the stories of past residents and their shenanigans.

I hope they have a happy and sage birthday snuggled in there dens. Maybe Annie has a few cubs or is preggers for some. I pray they stay away from cars, people and garbage.

As lovely as a fairy tale except it was real and true. It would be hard to improve on the pictures, also real and true. You and ABR are amazing. Could be a children’s store with paintings and then the real pictures of Oscar, Anne, and Boston Bear.

Thank you Curator Janet for sharing this beautiful Story of these sweet, precious Cubbies, thank you ABR for sharing about past residents of ABR, always soo interesting to learn, and happy to know that you all at ABR gave them their Second Chance at life back in the Wild! Started following ABR a little before Marvin Bear, Carter Bear, Sola Bear, Noli Bear were released back to the Wild! Absolutely love your Mission with all the cubbies that come to ABR! Thank you All, your sooo Awesome! 😀🐻🐻🐻🌲🌲🌲🌲🌾🌿🍇🍈🍎🍏🍒🍐🌲🌲🌲🌲🌲🌲🌲🌲🌲🌲🌲

The North Carolina Urban/Suburban Bear Study has a video at the top of their FB page of a mother bear (unfortunately raiding garbage cans) and five huge healthy cubs. They almost look like yearlings (?)

I love this story! Last year I adopted Annie just because it's my first name but I didn't know much about her. So glad to know she is one of ABR's success stories!!

Thank you for this heart-warming story of Annie, Oscar and Boston. It was before I found ABR so it was wonderful to read how Boston helped Annie to gain her confidence. He is an amazing bear. I hope they are all safe and warm somewhere, far away from humans. 💖💞💖

Awww such great tjings yiu all do for thise cubbies... thank you! I hope to attend a tour too. 😉

What a lovely story. I really appreciate these stories of the cubs rescued by ABR of past years since we didn’t get to know them anymore. It’s beautiful to know how they were rescued and how they thrived and became each other’s support through this time. Again, thank you ABR. ❤️

Thank you for sharing this story with us. I’m so glad they grew and returned to the wild bc of ABR and their amazing work for bears. Hope all of them survived and doing well.

That is, turned out to be, a SWEET STORY. I wish I could have known Boston and observed Annie with him. I love that he cared for her so tenderly.

Thank you for the walk down memory lane...Boston Bear is a saint . Offering his grapes is precious. A heartwarming story on a very cold night. God bless them all. t

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