5 hours ago

Appalachian Bear Rescue

Summitt Bear, our 14-month-old yearling, woke up after a good night’s sleep. Curator Coy is so pleased with his progress, hesitant as it is, he’s modified Summitt’s anti-refeeding syndrome diet by increasing his daily food ration from 25% to 50% of the bear’s body weight. “Refeeding syndrome” can occur when starving animals (or humans) are given too much food, too fast. It can be fatal, so the curators will feed Summitt this percentage three times a day for the next two days. If he’s stable after that, he’ll progress to a regular unrestricted diet.

He’s eating his applesauce/bear diet/antibiotic mixture with no complaints, and delivering presents in the form of copious amounts of urine and large, solid, light-brown scat, with no diarrhoea or evidence of internal bleeding. (Thank you, little bear!) Summitt walks to his food bowls and can sit and hold his head up. However, as soon as he’s finished eating, he goes to sleep. Summitt may still be exhausted after his ordeal; his rescue and treatment were stressful enough and we don’t know what he endured before his rescue. We wonder if Summitt managed to hibernate this winter; if so, some of his lethargy may be attributed to “walking hibernation”. Bears don’t exit their dens, ravenous and on the run; for the first few weeks, they don’t travel much, and eat relatively little while their bodies adjust to their wakened state. Regardless, Summitt was found lying down and unresponsive, not natural behavior for a bear at any time. He can sleep as much as he wants to, and the curators remains cautiously optimistic about his future. To aid in his recovery, we keep lighting in The Cub Nursery low, so the photos you see were enhanced in editing.

Thank you for your interest in Summitt and in our mission to return him to the wild.
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Summitt Bear, our 14-month-old yearling, woke up  after a good night’s sleep. Curator Coy is so pleased with his progress, hesitant as it is,  he’s modified Summitt’s anti-refeeding syndrome diet by increasing his daily food ration from 25% to 50% of the bear’s body weight. “Refeeding syndrome” can occur when starving animals (or humans) are given too much food, too fast. It can be fatal, so the curators will feed Summitt this percentage three times a day for the next two days. If he’s stable after that, he’ll progress to a regular unrestricted diet. 

He’s eating his applesauce/bear diet/antibiotic mixture with no complaints, and delivering presents in the form of copious amounts of urine and large, solid, light-brown scat, with no diarrhoea or evidence of internal bleeding. (Thank you, little bear!)  Summitt walks to his food bowls and can sit and hold his head up. However, as soon as he’s finished eating, he goes to sleep.  Summitt may still be exhausted after his ordeal; his rescue and treatment were stressful enough and we don’t know what he endured before his rescue. We wonder if Summitt managed to hibernate this winter; if so, some of his lethargy may be attributed to “walking hibernation”. Bears don’t exit their dens, ravenous and on the run; for the first few weeks, they don’t travel much, and eat relatively little while their bodies adjust to their wakened state. Regardless, Summitt was found lying down and unresponsive, not natural behavior for a bear at any time.  He can sleep as much as he wants to, and the curators remains cautiously optimistic about his future. To aid in his recovery, we keep lighting in The Cub Nursery low, so the photos you see were enhanced in editing. 

Thank you for your interest in Summitt and in our mission to return him to the wild. 
https://salsa4.salsalabs.com/o/51586/donate_page/donate?track=Website_Donate_Page_Link

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I heard Summit 🐻 bear got a blood transfusion was it from a former resident? Prayers for Summit 🐻 bear Thank you ABR, TWRA and UT Vet's for taking care of the Yearling

Just a thought. Do you think Summitt might have become separated from his Mother during the wildfires of last November?

I didn't see the announcement for this new bear. When/where did Summit Bear come to be a resident at ABR?

Is it possible that the mother bear passed away in the den?

Where Mother Bunny? The Queen of the cuddlers?

Summitt found a place in my heart from the beginning as all bears do. It's times like this that brings a tear to my eye to see something like this and then be able to see him recovering and progressing through your postings. Wish I could give him a big bear hug! All of you are blessed to have the knowledge and skills to help these little ones and I'm so glad you are there for them. Praying

I have read about Refeeding syndrome when reading about Holocaust. When good meaning ppl arived at the death camps, they fed the survivors thinking they where helping them. And it was not what they needed. So glad that the lessons are being repeated and you are sharing. Blessings to you for all the great work.

It's just such a fascinating job you all have at ABR. If I were 40 years younger, because of you, I'd even consider being a Curator instead of the Librarian I became. Perhaps as you visit schools and meet with people at the Welcome Center you will touch another young life and there will be others who will follow in your footsteps working with animal Rescue's such as ABR. You set such a great example and have taught us all so much. Black bears didn't mean a whole lot to me (other than I love all animals) until we retired to Western N.C. and I somehow found my way to ABR's web-page 7 years ago. It's just so thrilling and fascinating and such a "wonder of nature" to follow the cubs and now this sweet Yearling, Summitt. THANK YOU so much for all you do! You all - always give your ALL and then some!!

At the shelter where I volunteer, I actually heard myself explaining refeeding syndrome. (Which, BTW, applies to cats that have gotten themselves locked into abandoned houses until they're emaciated.) Only at ABR...

Sleep is always good when we are recovering. Sleep little Summit and continue to get better. We have no idea of what you been through but as long as you are comfortable enough to eat and sleep; then please do. So grateful that you are able to do what you do at ABR.

On second reading, the fact that bears are groggy for a while is somewhat reassuring. He's got a lot to do now. Furry hugs, and as always, let's hear it for poop.

So glad Summitt Bear has stabilized! Sounds like there is hope he can get strong enough to return to the wild. So glad ABR is there for him. ❤🐻

now if only these little bears could talk. but to sleep pretty much for so long and not wake up hungry lol? my son could take a lesson from these bear!. good to hear that little summitt is progressing so well!

What a beautiful baby. Im sure he is happy and thankful to have found people who care. I know I would if i were a sick baby bear on its own in thus big scary world.

Eat up hearty my little friend, it will serve you well in the end. They're making you feel better so when the time arrives, they'll release you back to the wild where you can thrive.

Sweet little one 💫🐻😇Bears are resilient, I am sure he will back to his ownself in very little time, thanks to the wonderful care of ABR ❤️❤️❤️🙏🏻🐻🌲

Glad to see he's feeling better, How lucky he is to recover in such a safe place. Many thank yous to the person who found him and got help for him.

Daily progress is all that's needed. Nature will reveal her plans for this little bear. 🙂

Way to go Curators!! I sure wish the cam was on the internet so we could watch. Go Summitt!!!

I get goosebumps as I read through and hear that Summitt is progressing. One paw step at a time sweet cubbie <3 Again, soooo many of us thank all of YOU at ABR <3

He is definitely getting the best of care at the ABR.

Sleep safe little bear. Dream of being healthy and free. It will soon happen. Thank you ABR.

Ohhh,soo hopeful!! Thank you for the update!! 🙂

So glad Summitt seems to be improving and enjoying his food, hopefully his sleeping will be a help with his healing,.

God Bless ABR as they care for Summitt. Thanks for updates.

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ABR Update-March 29, 2017-Summitt the Sleepy

Summitt, a 14-month-old male black bear, arrived at ABR on March 27, 2017. He weighed about 22 pounds and was dehydrated, underweight and suffering from anemia. Yesterday, Summitt received a blood transfusion at the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine. He returned to the Cub Nursery at Appalachian Bear Rescue and spent a quiet night, eating a little and sleeping a lot. Rest is as important to his recovery as food and medicine, so we’re happy he’s calm enough to sleep. You can see in the first photo that Summitt’s plumbing is working well; he produced lots of urine and some scat. In the second photo, after his pen was cleaned, he went back to sleep. Summitt is a yearling, not a cub, and has been on his own for some time. He may not need the comfort of a stuffed toy, but Charley Bear is on duty in case he does.

Many of you have asked about the blood transfusion and if bears, like humans, have different blood types .
It's likely American Black Bears do have different blood types; we’ve seen research that shows Asiatic Black Bears do. If an animal has never received a blood transfusion, they usually don't have a reaction to their first transfusion, even if it’s a different blood type. Since Summitt’s case was an emergency, the vets didn’t feel there was time to perform a "crossmatch" on Finn (the donor bear from the Knoxville Zoo) and Summit’s blood. However, if Summit were to need another blood transfusion, the vets would perform the crossmatch test with the donor and recipient blood to make sure they’re compatible.

Detailed blood analysis is still pending, but there was no evidence that Summitt consumed any toxic substances. Should we receive new information, we’ll let you know. Internal parasites can cause anemia, especially in bears that are malnourished. Summitt is receiving medicine for worms in every mouthful of applesauce he consumes and he’s doing his best to eliminate them.

Where do little bears get iron? Mother Bear milk is rich in fat, calcium and iron. We’re assuming that Summitt hasn’t been with his mother for a while, so that source of iron wasn’t available to him. Bears are omnivorous, and get their nutrients from a variety of foods, not just a single source. They eat what they find; ideally, eating a little of this and little of that will give them the nutrients they need. Summit wasn’t eating enough of anything to make a difference.

It’s too early to make definitive statements about Summitt’s future; we can say he’s better than he was yesterday and we hope he’ll be better tomorrow.

Thank you for caring about this little bear.

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ABR Update-March 29, 2017-Summitt the Sleepy

Summitt, a 14-month-old male black bear, arrived at ABR on March 27, 2017. He weighed about 22 pounds and was dehydrated, underweight and suffering from anemia. Yesterday, Summitt received a blood transfusion at the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine. He returned to the Cub Nursery at Appalachian Bear Rescue and spent a quiet night, eating a little and sleeping a lot. Rest is as important to his recovery as food and medicine, so we’re happy he’s calm enough to sleep. You can see in the first photo that Summitt’s plumbing is working well; he produced lots of urine and some scat. In the second photo, after his pen was cleaned, he went back to sleep. Summitt is a yearling, not a cub, and has been on his own for some time. He may not need the comfort of a stuffed toy, but Charley Bear is on duty in case he does. 

Many of you have asked about the blood transfusion and if bears, like humans, have different blood types . 
Its likely American Black Bears do have different blood types; we’ve seen research that shows Asiatic Black Bears do. If an animal has never received a blood transfusion, they usually dont have a reaction to their first transfusion, even if it’s a different blood type. Since Summitt’s case was an emergency, the vets didn’t feel there was time to perform a crossmatch on Finn (the donor bear from the Knoxville Zoo) and Summit’s blood. However, if Summit were to need another blood transfusion, the vets would perform the crossmatch test with the donor and recipient blood to make sure they’re compatible.

Detailed blood analysis is still pending, but there was no evidence that Summitt consumed any toxic substances. Should we receive new information, we’ll let you know. Internal parasites can cause anemia, especially in bears that are malnourished. Summitt is receiving medicine for worms in every mouthful of applesauce he consumes and he’s doing his best to eliminate them.

Where do little bears get iron? Mother Bear milk is rich in fat, calcium and iron. We’re assuming that Summitt hasn’t been with his mother for a while, so that source of iron wasn’t available to him. Bears are omnivorous, and get their nutrients from a variety of foods, not just a single source. They eat what they find; ideally, eating a little of this and little of that will give them the nutrients they need. Summit wasn’t eating enough of anything to make a difference. 

It’s too early to make definitive statements about Summitt’s future; we can say he’s better than he was yesterday and we hope he’ll be better tomorrow. 

Thank you for caring about this little bear.

https://salsa4.salsalabs.com/o/51586/donate_page/donate?track=Website_Donate_Page_Link

Comment on Facebook

It doesn't look like he is interested in a security bear. Do you think he is afraid of it? He's sleeping away from it and where he left a deposit. 😆 I hope he feels better.

I am so glad Summitt is holding his own. So glad you are there for him. Odd question... how is Finn, the donor bear? Does he recover quickly from his donation? Thanks for loving "our" bears!!!

Is it possible that he and mom were separated during the wild fire? I'm so happy for this little guy and Summit is a great name for this little fighter ... even if I am a UConn fan ❤🐻❤

Sweet baby. Does it appear he was away from his mom all winter?

Wait.... can we get Mother Bunny stuffed bunnies in the gift shop????

So glad he feels safe and has his own cuddly-wuddly! Hopefully it was trained in support by Mother Bunny herself.

Will Mother Bunny be back on the job? It seems Summit could use some additional baby-level TLC. 🙂

Ok, I'm just gonna put this out there, if Summit takes to Charley Bear like some other bear took to Mother Bunny,you KNOW that Charley Bear will have star status and need a retirement display box...and ABR will need a bigger gift shop!! Appreciate the update & educational info.

What a wonderful update on Summit bear. Please correct me if I'm wrong, I didn't know ABR took in yearlings, I thought it was cubs only. Do you think Summit was separated from his Mama early, or is he at the age it was time to separate and go off on his own? Thanks, ABR, for all you do.

Poor little baby. I am sure it is very comforting to feel safe, be able to sleep and have food even if he is a bear. Like any animal they do not expect much for comfort coming from the environment and circumstances like Summit. We have 5 cats that we adore. Each came one a year. They were hungry, needed kindness and security. We adore all, they are house kitties, get their check ups twice yearly or if a problem immediate. They have issues, one lost his diseased colon, one had a urinary problem - major surgery, one has a heart issue, and one a thyroid problem w/ renal disease. They are like family and require additional care. The youngest is very healthy and a wild little guy. He keeps us entertained. When we travel, we have xlarge cage for 4 and one in his cage. When you take an animal you make a commitment.

How is Summitt today??

If Summitt only knew how much love and support was coming his way! ❤ Thank you ABR and UT for all you do for these precious babies!

How interesting. I didn't know the Zoo Knoxville bears were blood donors for ABR. Amazing how so many groups come together for a common goal ❤️

This is wonderful news. As a lab tech, and a hospital blood bank supervisor, and a lover of bears, Summitt is a special case for me to follow. I give you all a big thank you for the work that you do for these beautiful bears.

Thanks for the update on Summit...He has already touched so many people's hearts and is loved by all. Lil fella has had a tough time but he is on his way now...A second chance is a beautiful thing ! Thanks to ABR and UT !

I honestly stay up at night worrying about who is taking care of these little bears (like my little Finnegan) and am so grateful to ABR for the incredible work that is done on their behalf as legislation is being passed allowing hunters to go into to their den while they're hibernating.....sigh

I'm hoping the diagnosis will be "Yearling separated from Mama too soon and needs assistance with daily living skills". Please note this message was typed by someone who isn't even qualified to be a Junior Curator. 🙂 I love "better than yesterday"! Go Summitt!!!!

You,this makes me sooo happy!! Thank you so very much for the update!! I look forward to them!! Hopefully he is on the road to being a healthy little bear!! Thank each and every one of you for all that you do. I hope today will be a good day!! 🙂

That has to be a good sign that his plumbing is working,and like us humans sleeping is good for healing,so hopefully with all you do for him we'll see him progress as the days go on,

ABR is the next best thing when mom is no longer in the picture. so glad this little guy is with you! and many thanks to the person that cared enough to call someone

The stories of these bears tug at my heartstrings. It's so sad to read of their illnesses, injuries, etc BUT I must say the pictures always warm my heart. Whatever the outcome, this little bear is warm, clean, fed and cared for by the most amazing people. So much better than being out in the wilderness, cold and alone. Thanks for all you do. You all truly amaze me.

So glad that Summit's plumbing is working well. I am sure Charlie is a comfort. He is a very pretty little bear Curator Coy did a good job last night. Could he be practicing for a two legged girl cubby to add to the two boys? Keep up with the great work ABR and thanks for the Mother Bunny link

So glad Charlie bear is there just in case Summitt bear needs a buddy, that's good he is getting plenty of rest and has eaten and gone potty...Thank You ABR ♥....prayers for sweet Summitt bear that he will get stronger..

The emotional roller coaster has begun. When I came home from work yesterday the first thing my husband told me was there was a bear at ABR. Last night at supper we read the updates. Now, I will be looking for updates and worrying. Thank you ABR so much❤️🐻🐻🐻

Thank you for the update ABR, My heart goes out to Summitt , hopeful for a ful recovery, and sending out love and prayers

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ABR Update #3-March 28, 2017-So far, so good

Summitt Bear is back in The Cub Nursery at Appalachian Bear Rescue. He was alert when he returned and nibbled on bear diet pellets and applesauce. We’re glad he likes applesauce, though we’ve yet to meet a bear who doesn’t. We use it to hide worm medicine and antibiotics so our furry residents will take them. Summitt seemed to perk up after his historic blood transfusion at UT, and his gums have taken on a healthier pinkish color. Curator Coy took some of the bear diet pellets and crushed them into the applesauce. This seemed more to Summitt’s taste and he ate it all. He's still on a restricted diet to combat refeeding syndrome, so he'll be fed small amounts every few hours. Curator Coy is staying at the facility again tonight. He’ll give Summitt some privacy and observe him via The Nursery Cam in the office; we’re sure that little bear has had enough of humans for one day.

We want to express our gratitude to The Knoxville Zoo who came to Summitt’s aid. It’s quite a coincidence the bear whose blood was transfused into Summitt is named Finn. We think all bears named Finn are wonderful. Below is a link to the official press release from the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine with several photos of the transfusion procedure. We thank Dr. Ramsay, Dr. Sheldon and their team for doing so much to save Summitt. And our thanks to the people who first reported seeing Summitt and to the TWRA officers who went to collect him; without their prompt action, Summitt wouldn’t have survived.

Thank you for your kind and compassionate comments. We value your friendship and we’ll try to answer your questions in tomorrow’s post.
vetmed.tennessee.edu/News/Pages/current_news.aspx#news351
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ABR Update #3-March 28, 2017-So far, so good

Summitt Bear is back in The Cub Nursery at Appalachian Bear Rescue. He was alert when he returned and nibbled on bear diet pellets and applesauce. We’re glad he likes applesauce, though we’ve yet to meet a bear who doesn’t. We use it to hide worm medicine and antibiotics so our furry residents will take them. Summitt seemed to perk up after his historic blood transfusion at UT, and his gums have taken on a healthier pinkish color. Curator Coy took some of the bear diet pellets and crushed them into the applesauce. This seemed more to Summitt’s taste and he ate it all. Hes still on a restricted diet to combat refeeding syndrome, so hell be fed small amounts every few hours. Curator Coy is staying at the facility again tonight. He’ll give Summitt some privacy and observe him via The Nursery Cam in the office; we’re sure that little bear has had enough of humans for one day. 

We want to express our gratitude to The Knoxville Zoo who came to Summitt’s aid. It’s quite a coincidence the bear whose blood was transfused into Summitt is named Finn. We think all bears named Finn are wonderful. Below is a link to the official press release from the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine with several photos of the transfusion procedure. We thank Dr. Ramsay, Dr. Sheldon and their team for doing so much to save Summitt. And our thanks to the people who first reported seeing Summitt and to the TWRA officers who went to collect him; without their prompt action, Summitt wouldn’t have survived. 

Thank you for your kind and compassionate comments. We value your friendship and we’ll try to answer your questions in tomorrow’s post. 
https://vetmed.tennessee.edu/News/Pages/current_news.aspx#news351

Comment on Facebook

Thanks, too, to the Knoxville Zoo and their Finn Bear. I hope he got the bear equivalent of orange juice and cookies for donating his blood to Summit.

glad summit is doing better. please, what is "refeeding syndrome"?

Did Finn get a Tshirt and a Free Texas Roadhouse appetizer coupon?

Summitt is such a lucky little guy with having so many wonderful care givers! It's just amazing what's been done to give him a 2nd chance at a healthy life! ABR, UTCVM and Knoxville Zoo ... you are all amazing at what you do!

Amazing. I am so proud of the united efforts to save this precious animal. It seems everyone else in the world exploits and kills animals and East TN stands firm and protects the wildlife. God Bless you all! Prayers for Summit.

I am curious, humans have blood types: A,B, AB, and O. And besides being one of these "letter blood types" we are also negative or positive. Are all bears the same blood type?. I am rooting for Summitt Bear. Thanks for all the great work you guys do to help these little bears!

Thank you for your wonderful work with these precious bears! You are evidence of God's presence on earth!

So glad Summitt is doing better. I've said for years that we need to take care of the wildlife we have instead of waiting until a species is in danger of going instinct. ABR is doing a wonderful job of protecting our bears. I so very much appreciate the work you do.

That is wonderful of Knoxville Zoo And UT Veterinary Staff for setting up the transfusion And thanks to the people who found him and for TWRA for getting him To ABR and thank you Curator Coy for staying and watching over this little precious baby

A quiet night is just what little Summit needs. Wish I could be there to hear his trilling. It is his way of saying "thank you" to all (especially brother, Finn) involved in giving him a second chance. Heal on, little Summit! You've got this.

Ok Summitt, you're in the best place with the best folks. And, you have thousands of us cheering you on to better health. You can do this. Show all of us what a strong little bear you are, so you can be free in the wild soon. Thanks ABR

Thanks to everyone involved in Summit's rescue! I was thrilled to find out another Finn contributed too! Any bear named Finn is special! I hope and pray Summit gets healthier and stronger everyday! Looking forward to tomorrow's update! Thanks Curator Coy for watching over our new cubby!

So happy Summit Bear is doing better!! Thank you to our Creator for blessing all these wonderful humans Curator Coy, Dr Sheldon and Dr Ramsay UT VetMed to Finn for his blood, the Knoxville Zoo for their gifts! I well be praying for Summit Bear!! Stay strong and fight!! Thank you ABR you're are awesome!😊💙🐻🙏🏻

It's great to see that Summit is up and about,he seems to be a little fighter,and with the help of Knoxville Zoo,and Finn, He seems to be perking up.the applesauce certainly seems to help him,looking forward to updates on Sumitt,hopefully all good,

Very thankful to all involved and very thankful to the humans who first observed that he was in trouble and contacted the proper people instead of trying to "rescue" him themselves.

Thank you for the update ABR. Praying for Summitt Bear and anxiously await an update tomorrow morning. And thank you Curator Coy for staying with Summit Bear.

So thankful to all of you and the rescuers, Finn and def the doctors etc who helped him thus far. Prayers for Summitt

Thanks Coy for watching over Summitt thru the night. Sure hope and pray he makes it. At least, he will be taken care of with all the love that he needs.

I'm so proud to live in a state that loves and takes such good care of our bears. Summit Bear has the best chance at growing up happy in the mountains Because of you all! Thank you to ABR and everyone else that helped this baby.

I'm happy that Summitt is doing as well as could be expected so far. Thanks to everyone who has gotten him this far. I hope that he'll have a full recovery and will look forward to watching him grow to young adulthood in the coming months.

So happy that Summit is doing better. And I also thought about the Finn connection. Thank you to the Knoxville Zoo for helping to save a beautiful cub.

Hoping he has a good night and is his way to recovery. Finn has become like an angels name for bears. Thank you for taking care of our little ones.

So traumatic for such a little fellow. These gorgeous cubbies are so fortunate to have so many caring people in their corner.

Yay! Glad little Summitt is doing better. Hopefully has turned a corner and on the mend. And thank you all for all your good care and TLC. And yes I love bears named Finn. 💕🐻💕

So glad to hear that Summitt is doing better and praying for his continued recovery. Thanks to all involved in helping him to get back on his feet.

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2 days ago

Appalachian Bear Rescue

Late yesterday afternoon, we received a call from TWRA officers on their way to a farm near Bristol, TN. A small bear had been observed for 48 hours lurking near the barn and it seemed thin and lethargic, not behaving normally. Curator Coy and Curator Tom arranged to meet the officers at the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine to take possession of the bear should it require rescue. As it turned out, it did.

Wildlife officers found him lying down near a stream, oblivious to their presence, and transported him to UT. Dr. Julie Sheldon and her team examined the bear for fractures and wounds but found none. The bear, a male yearling, is about 14 months old. He has a healthy coat, but is thin for his age, weighing only 22 pounds (a yearling, coming out of hibernation, should weigh in the 35 to 50 pound range). He is severely anemic and dehydrated, so Dr. Sheldon gave him plenty of fluids and iron and vitamin shots. He arrived at the ABR facility late last night and was admitted to The Cub Nursery. To prevent refeeding syndrome, he was put on a restricted diet of diluted bear milk replacement and small amounts of applesauce to entice him to take his worm medicine. Refeeding Syndrome can occur when a starving animal (or human) is given too much food, too quickly and it can be fatal. The little bear ate some applesauce, lapped up a little of the diluted formula and went to sleep. Curator Coy is hopeful the bear will recover, but is guarded in his optimism. We've named Bear #258 in honor of the late, great coach of the University of Tennessee Lady Vols basketball team, Pat Summitt. Please welcome, Summitt Bear.

Thank you for helping us help him.

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Late yesterday afternoon, we received a call from TWRA officers on their way to a farm near Bristol, TN.  A small bear had been observed for 48 hours lurking near the barn and it seemed thin and lethargic, not behaving normally.  Curator Coy  and Curator Tom arranged to meet the officers at the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine to take possession of the bear should it require rescue. As it turned out, it did. 

Wildlife officers found him lying down near a stream, oblivious to their presence, and transported him to UT.  Dr. Julie Sheldon and her team examined the bear for fractures and wounds but found none. The bear, a male yearling, is about 14 months old. He has a healthy coat, but is thin for his age, weighing only 22 pounds (a yearling, coming out of hibernation, should weigh in the 35 to 50 pound range). He is severely anemic and dehydrated, so Dr. Sheldon gave him plenty of fluids and iron and vitamin shots. He arrived at the ABR facility late last night and was admitted to The Cub Nursery. To prevent refeeding syndrome, he was put on a restricted diet of diluted bear milk replacement and small amounts of applesauce to entice him to take his worm medicine. Refeeding Syndrome can occur when a starving animal (or human) is given too much food, too quickly and it can be fatal. The little bear ate some applesauce, lapped up a little of the diluted formula and went to sleep. Curator Coy is hopeful the bear will recover, but is guarded in his optimism. Weve named Bear #258 in honor of the late, great coach of the University of Tennessee Lady Vols basketball team, Pat Summitt.  Please welcome, Summitt Bear. 

Thank you for helping us help him.

https://salsa4.salsalabs.com/o/51586/donate_page/donate?track=Website_Donate_Page_Link

Comment on Facebook

He already looks better! Is that a friend or blanket with him?

Bless his heart. Why is he so thin since the mast seemed so good this year?

Is that Mother Bunny keeping him company?

Those eyes!! He knows already he is in a good place. Thank you so more for giving bears a fighting chance, and for educating and entertaining us at the same time!

Ohhhh thank you so sad was hoping that you would get a break this season. Happy for the bear though he got some milk, and a place to sleep. People who care fantastic again thanks

Welcome Summit! So happy for you that you were found in your time of need & brought to ABR. You couldn't be in any better hands. They will take good care of you. Just rest & eat & get better now.

A very warm welcome to sweet Summit. He is in wArm living hands now and will thrive. Looking forward to following his progress. Thanks to all of you.

He looks like ,"I went to sleep for two minutes, and was abducted by aliens!" Lol I know he's enjoying being pampered and fed!

Look at that face, what a beautiful boy. I will love following you get strong and healthy.

Missed initial post! So glad he's being cared for by ABR

What a cutie!! Poor baby you just wonder what he's been through and why

Summit looks like he is getting better. Thank you ABR! Hope he lives a happy Bears life!

Thank you ABR! I missed the initial post about Summit, will have to look it up.

Beautiful Eyes...This one is going to be a heartbreaker !

Welcome Summitt Bear! You're in the right place! Eat, drink and get healthy! You are in a safe place!

look at that sweet face! His eyes! I am in love! I know he is good hands now, and his recovery is around the corner!

he looks good this morning- those eyes are nice and alert!

What a sweet face. Welcome Summit, #ABR will take great care of you.

What a sweet sweet face...I see a trip to the ABR office to in Townsend soon to adopt a little Summit Bear!!!

2017 bear season is underway! Hello Summitt Bear!

Poor baby! You are in good hands! Eat and rest and climb those trees! ❤😘

Poor dear little one, thrive and return to the wild stronger.

Looks like Summitt is feeling better already! What a cutie! 🐻👍🏻❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️

Wishing many more Good Mornings to you Summit bear!! Welcome to ABR!

Have been waiting for our first baby bear to arrive...so happy, she is in a good place...love the name

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5 days ago

Appalachian Bear Rescue

It was 76F (24.4C) today, perfect weather to placate a monster lurking at the facility. The last Perimeter Pen has been insisting (silently) that it wants to join its twin at their new location. Moving this behemoth is one of the few items left on our “must do” list, and the least appealing. Nevertheless, curator, board members and volunteers gathered to perform the deed, resorting to magical thinking (didn’t work), the knowledge of the ancient Egyptians and Greeks and lots of brute force to accomplish the task. Thank you Curator Tom, Ed, Lisa, Dana, Joey, Jim, Frank and Terry for successfully matching human ingenuity against Perimeter Pen inertia.

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It was 76F (24.4C) today, perfect weather to placate a monster lurking at the facility. The last Perimeter Pen has been insisting (silently)  that it wants to join its twin at their new location. Moving this behemoth is one of the few items left on our “must do” list, and the least appealing.  Nevertheless, curator, board members and volunteers gathered to perform the deed, resorting to magical thinking (didn’t work), the knowledge of the ancient Egyptians and Greeks and lots of brute force to accomplish the task. Thank you Curator Tom, Ed, Lisa, Dana, Joey, Jim, Frank and Terry for successfully matching human ingenuity against Perimeter Pen inertia. 

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Does the UT Vet School of Medicine takes care of those who takes care of the bears and their houses?? 😉. Y'all might their services after this move.

Could you remind us (me) what the perimeter pens are used for?

I hope all went for a nice cold adult beverage!

So very glad you were able to "drive" it to the new location! Hopefully no one ended up with a hernia or very sore back! Thank you for ALL you do for the bears!!

Y'all are truly amazing and wonderful folks. Thank you for all you do.

I'm so glad the weather is cooperative right now. There is always so much to do with outdoor caging.

Great job! Sorry magical thinking didn't work. And as a huge Friends fan, all I could think was "Pivot." "Pivot."

Good job. I was exhausted just from looking at the photos. Take a well deserved break! !! Thank you!!!!

Way to go ABR. A job well done. Rest well before the next job! Love you all. 💙🐻

There is never a dull moment for the ABR busy bees, always something 🤗😍🐝🐝🐝👌🏻✌🏻☮️💜💜💜🐻🐻🐻🌲🌲🌲

bear in site to appreciate all of this manual labor.... sigh....such is life

I was placating monsters of a somewhat similar nature but a miniature scale compared to this bad boy!!!! Spring cleaning! Someone will need that pen sometime in the future.

You all deserve a big thank you. ABR is looking good.

Whew! What a job! Congrats for a job well done!!!!!❤

Shoo! I bet y'all will rest well tonight!

Ya'll never cease to amaze me! Great work!!!

You guys are truly amazing!!

A Herculean task if ever I saw one. 👏💖

YAY TEAM!!!

team work awesome job ya all 🙂

Massive job!!

WOW. To do list DONE. Way to go ABR XXXX

Lot of work!

👍🏼good work

Awesome work by all! We do love u guys, u know! 💜🐻🐻💜

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ABR Update-March 24, 2017-Bears are on the move!

The bears are telling us winter is over! We’re receiving reports of single sub-adults and adult males on the move. Soon, mother bears and their cubs will be leaving their dens too. ABR has never gone a full year without a bear in residence; it would be wonderful if not a single cub came to us this year because of something a human did or didn’t do. Help make our wish come true. If you live in bear country, please drive carefully, secure all trash bins and remove bird feed, pet food or anything a bear might interpret as an invitation to dine. And please, respect the bears you love by keeping your distance.
www.youtube.com/watch?v=X_1zAON3pCQI'm Sam Venable from the Knoxville News Sentinel, speaking on behalf of Appalachian Bear Rescue. Did you know our beloved black bears are put down when they ...
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Has Appalachian Bear Rescue ever thought of having one of those clock/calendars that tracks how many days without a bear in residence due to human interference? Sort of like those signs that track how many days without an accident in the workplace?

What is the least numbers of bears you have ever had? And the most? Thanks!

In my yard....the crows are back, the crows are back, the crows are back in town! Time to hang fake dead crow back on his limb!! Unlike Mother Bunny, out of retirement he comes!

I feel if anyone truly loves bears the way they say they do then they would have no trouble abiding by the above requests. What a great year with no Bears and time to work on your facility. I hope the spring holds true as well but we who love and support you know you stand ready to help if need be. Love and respect for you and da Bears!♥️

After last year you all could use a break. Even Mother Bunny. I am so impress with all the work that has been accomplished. Last year really tested the limits. The trees looked very tired after you released the last of the foundling. They are always on my mind and I hope they enjoyed a nice warm tree to sleep in. Thank you as always for the tremendous amount of hard work that you put in.

Prayers for bears & all wildlife. As for bird seed, I never have understood putting it out in warmer months when there are plenty of insects, worms, etc for the birds to dine on.

Another month or so for them to wake up here in Alaska still have a good snow pack and 6 degrees this morning....

That is such GREAT news. Lets hope it continues, but there is still time yet, unfortunately.

No bears can also mean the population has dwindled due to human intervention.

Be bear aware! I hope you don't receive any cubs, but I am so thankful you are there just in case you do. ABR does a fantastic job with these cubs and gives them a second chance to be wild and free. Thank you ABR!

Wishing & hoping with you that beard in your catchment area stay safe

Yes, 3 in the Cove today. Praying for the safety of our bears.

Shared both your post and the video separately. As always, thank you so much for trying to educate the public.

Love will be in the air soon.....the boys will be searching far and wide.

Praying for our sweet baby bears ! I hope the ABR is very lonely this year !

well done. I look forward to seeing that one on TV.

Praying for a great year for the bears!!!

🍷I'm with you....no bears at ABR this year!!!!!❤

Sam Venable! <3

Ty and sharing for a friendly reminder to friends too!

I hope so too♡♡♡

Praying for these magnificent black bears, that humans can become more aware and responsible not to feed or speed where bears live, it's there home!! 🙏🏻❤️😘🐻

Saw a mama and her two cubs on Little River Rd late last week on the way to Cades Cove.

Buck 'n Lisa Buckland hey watch this

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1 week ago

Appalachian Bear Rescue

On November 24, 2009, TWRA officers brought a 10-month-old female cub to Appalachian Bear Rescue. The cub was severely dehydrated, malnourished and suffered from wounds in her chest and hip. She weighed just 20 pounds, far below the 50-60 pounds she needed to survive the winter months.

The cub was captured at the Denso Manufacturing Plant in Maryville , TN. The employees had watched the cub in a nearby tree and concerned for her welfare, they alerted TWRA officers. They’d named her “Little Denso”, and in their honor, we kept the name.

Little Denso was examined on arrival, and her wounds treated as best we could. She was in such a fragile state, it was deemed necessary she rest and recover before going to The University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine for further examination.

She awakened from her sedation, confused and frightened, not used to confinement in a pen. However, she relaxed, drank lots of water, and nibbled on grapes, apple slices and yogurt. Then she nestled in a bed of straw and slept, exhausted from her ordeals.

Her first full day at ABR offered more rest, more food, antibiotics and the supplements that would help her tiny body recover. Her fur was in poor condition and she was frail and bony; it was obvious she’d been orphaned for some time. During that first week, ABR was in daily contact with UT’s veterinarians, updating them on Little Denso’s wounds, her behavior and her disposition. Her recovery was remarkable; she grew visibly stronger every day, and her wounds healed quickly. Little Denso remained confined to a pen to expedite her recovery, but in close proximity to two other cubs who were recovering from injury and trauma. She was able to see and vocalize with them, the interaction good for all three cubs. When it was time to move them to the Wild Enclosure, they were already acquainted.

After almost 6 weeks of recovery, Little Denso was ready for more space to exercise and direct interaction with other cubs. On her release to the Wild Enclosure, she did what all cubs do and climbed the first tree she saw. She scaled the tree with such enthusiasm, it was obvious her wounds had healed. She lodged herself in the fork of the tree and spent the rest of the day there, snoozing. For weeks, Little Denso remained high in the treetops during the day and descended at night to interact with the other cubs and enjoy her meals. She continued to grow stronger and gain weight.

Little Denso and three of her closest bear buddies did something we didn’t see at ABR during the busy 2015-2016 season; they denned in the Wild Enclosure. Our recent residents were too hungry to den and though we would never discourage a resident bear from denning, we would rather bears hibernate in the wild rather than at the facility. Little Denso and her buddies slept until mid-April. As they emerged from their den, they were examined and pronounced ready for release. Little Denso left ABR on May 20, 2010, weighing 80 pounds. She would be about eight years old now, and we hope she’s had a happy life and cubs of her own.

Thank you for helping us help bears like Little Denso.
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On November 24, 2009, TWRA officers brought a 10-month-old female cub to Appalachian Bear Rescue. The cub was severely dehydrated, malnourished and suffered from wounds in her chest and hip.  She weighed just 20 pounds, far below the 50-60 pounds she needed to survive the winter months.  

The cub was captured at the Denso Manufacturing Plant in Maryville , TN. The employees had watched the cub in a nearby tree and concerned for her welfare, they alerted TWRA officers.  They’d named her “Little Denso”, and in their honor, we kept the name.

Little Denso was examined on arrival, and her wounds treated as best we could.  She was in such a fragile state, it was deemed necessary she rest and recover before going to The University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine for further examination.  

She awakened from her sedation, confused and frightened, not used to confinement in a pen.  However, she relaxed, drank lots of water, and nibbled on grapes, apple slices and yogurt.  Then she nestled in a bed of straw and slept, exhausted from her ordeals.   

Her first full day at ABR offered more rest, more food, antibiotics and the supplements that would help her tiny body recover. Her fur was in poor condition and she was frail and bony; it was obvious she’d been orphaned for some time. During that first week, ABR was in daily contact with UT’s veterinarians, updating them on Little Denso’s wounds, her behavior and her disposition.  Her recovery was remarkable; she grew visibly stronger every day, and  her wounds healed quickly.  Little Denso remained confined to  a pen to expedite her recovery, but in close proximity to two other cubs who were recovering from injury and trauma.  She was able to see and vocalize with them, the interaction good for all three cubs.  When it was time to move them to the Wild Enclosure, they were already acquainted. 

After almost 6 weeks of recovery, Little Denso was ready for more space to exercise and direct interaction with other cubs.  On her release to the Wild Enclosure, she did what all cubs do and climbed the first tree she saw.  She scaled the tree with such enthusiasm, it was obvious her wounds had healed.  She lodged herself in the fork of the tree and spent the rest of the day there, snoozing. For weeks, Little Denso remained high in the treetops during the day and descended at night to interact with the other cubs and enjoy her meals.  She continued to grow stronger and gain weight.  

Little Denso and three of her closest bear buddies did something we didn’t see at ABR during the busy 2015-2016 season; they denned in the Wild Enclosure. Our recent residents were too hungry to den and though we would never discourage a resident bear from denning, we would rather bears hibernate in the wild rather than at the facility. Little Denso and her buddies slept until mid-April.  As they emerged from their den, they were examined and pronounced ready for release.  Little Denso left ABR on May 20, 2010, weighing 80 pounds. She would be about eight years old now, and we hope she’s had a happy life and cubs of her own. 

Thank you for helping us help bears like Little Denso.
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Tis a beautiful story. And did Little Denso get a GPS collar? I'm thinking not since you don't know how she is, or I should say, where she is.

I know TWRA tries to release the cubs near the area they were found. I'm sure they didn't release Little Denso near the plant - just buildings and traffic there- so hope they found her a nice home!

Will Curator Coy's study tell us how all the released cubs have fared?

wonder how she got to Denso? Too busy.

I'll be donating again in May. Ty

Love the story of little Denso. So thankful she was seen & rescued & I hope she is well and happy with a beautiful family. God bless her and all the good people who brought her back to good health.🐻

Wonderful story..hope she's still healthy and well, living a good life. Thank you for giving her her second chance. Like you do for all the bears you help. You're the best!

What a wonderful story she was so lucky to have been rescued and her arrival at ABR was the best thing that could happen to her......

Thank God for ABR and UTMED thanks you all of you this precious black bear was able to get better and live free!! Those eye😊 💜💜💜🐻

Love hearing the success stories of the bears that you've helped at ABR! Hope you're still out there living a good life Denso!

I didn't know about Little Denso! What a wonderful story.

Thank you all for the life you give back to the bears who have suffered and would not survive without ABR.

Beautiful and sweet little Denso I am so glad you were rescued and rehabilitated by the wonderful and amazing ABR 😇🙏🏻🙌🏻 It must have been wonderful to have sleeping Bears in your five star establishment, a Bear version of a Bed and Breakfast 😇🙏🏻❤️❤️❤️❤️🐻🐻🐻😴😴😴😴

Wonderful story and so heartbreaking that she had such an awful time as a young cub, but thank you ABR and I join you in wishing, hoping she grew, matured and raised her own cubs and is still out there somewhere telling her cubs about her early childhood

Great story and another success story for ABR, you do such wonderful work there, God Bless you all!!! ♥

Love love love this story!!! We are all imaging Little Denso and all her gorgeous cubbies! Maybe one or two of her babies have had their own time at ABR!

We're great fans of ABR and have a great deal of affection for the staff and support the great things you do. Thank you!

LOVE IT !!! WITHOUT ABR SHE WOULD NOT HAVE HAD A CHANCE....LOVE IT !!! THANK YOU ABR 🙂

She felt safe. What a wonderful prescription for sleep. Love it.

I love her name! Hope she is Momma Denso now 🙂

Great article, amazing work to help these bears.

Just a beautiful story of what you beautiful friends of bears do. Thank you .

I love this! Thank you for sharing.

Great story, thnx for sharing!

That brings tears to my eyes!!

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