18 minutes ago

Appalachian Bear Rescue

ABR chose January 22 as the “official” birthday for all our resident bears because it falls mid-way in the range of possible birthdates, early January to early February. We celebrate Cubby Birthday every month because each one is an important milestone on our residents’ journey back to the wild.

April Bear is fifteen months old today. She's a clever, determined yearling. How clever? How determined? She’s been confined to The Red Roof Recovery Center for the last few weeks, recuperating from broken ribs suffered in a car accident. The adjustable ceilings in the internal rooms and the exterior acclimation pens were lowered to prevent her from climbing. We wondered how long she’d tolerate this arrangement and late yesterday afternoon she told us our time is up.

There are no security cams in the Outdoor Acclimation Pens; to observe April, the curators must walk up and peer around the corner of the Recovery Center. Yesterday, Curator David took a quick photo of April in the Outdoor Pen; she seemed content and looked well. A few hours later, he returned. We can only imagine his surprise at finding April sitting on TOP of the adjustable ceiling, sunny herself in the afternoon light. HOW?

Since April wasn’t going to tell us how she did it, we deduced the following: the adjustable ceiling in the interior rooms butt against cinderblock, so there’s no “give” between it and the wall. April, clever bear, discovered the outside fencing had enough “give” to let her squeeze between it and the edge of the ceiling. She couldn’t get out of the pen and it doesn’t look like she wanted to. She likely tired of the low ceiling and just wanted more room.

Curator David wondered how to get her down and as always, it was “food, glorious food” that lured her in. Curator David noted how quickly she managed to get back inside; there didn’t seem to be much effort involved. A black bear yearling is strong, and bending the fence to climb between it and the ceiling was cub’s play.

A flurry of conference calls ensued (April was not included) and decisions were made. Curator David raised the Outdoor Acclimation Pen ceiling to full height, allowing April more head-room. The internal ceilings will be left in their lowered position for now. Her transfer to a large Outdoor Acclimation Pen will likely happen sooner than planned. After April leaves, the Outdoor Pen fencing will be reinforced and we’ll install a security camera over it. We wish April a very happy birthday and thank her for showing us where we can improve. We're always open to critique from our residents.

It’s also Earth Day and we wish peace for all life on this wonderful, miraculous planet, regardless of the form it takes. ❤️

salsa4.salsalabs.com/o/51586/donate_page/donate?track=Website_Donate_Page_Link
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ABR chose January 22 as the “official” birthday for all our resident bears because it falls mid-way in the range of possible birthdates, early January to early February. We celebrate Cubby Birthday every month because each one is an important milestone on our residents’ journey back to the wild.  

April Bear is fifteen months old today. Shes a clever, determined yearling. How clever? How determined? She’s been confined to The Red Roof Recovery Center for the last few weeks, recuperating from broken ribs suffered in a car accident. The adjustable ceilings in the internal rooms and the exterior acclimation pens were lowered to prevent her from climbing. We wondered how long she’d tolerate this arrangement and late yesterday afternoon she told us our time is up. 

There are no security cams in the Outdoor Acclimation Pens; to observe April, the curators must walk up and peer around the corner of the Recovery Center. Yesterday, Curator David took a quick photo of April in the Outdoor Pen; she seemed content and looked well. A few hours later, he returned. We can only imagine his surprise at finding April sitting on TOP of the adjustable ceiling, sunny herself in the afternoon light. HOW? 

Since April wasn’t going to tell us how she did it, we deduced the following: the adjustable ceiling in the interior rooms butt against cinderblock, so there’s no “give” between it and the wall. April, clever bear, discovered the outside fencing had enough “give” to let her squeeze between it and the edge of the ceiling. She couldn’t get out of the pen and it doesn’t look like she wanted to. She likely tired of the low ceiling and just wanted more room.

 Curator David wondered how to get her down and as always, it was “food, glorious food” that lured her in. Curator David noted how quickly she managed to get back inside; there didn’t seem to be much effort involved. A black bear yearling is strong, and bending the fence to climb between it and the ceiling was cub’s play. 

A flurry of conference calls ensued (April was not included) and decisions were made. Curator David raised the Outdoor Acclimation Pen ceiling to full height, allowing April more head-room. The internal ceilings will be left in their lowered position for now. Her transfer to a large Outdoor Acclimation Pen will likely happen sooner than planned. After April leaves, the Outdoor Pen fencing will be reinforced and we’ll install a security camera over it. We wish April a very happy birthday and thank her for showing us where we can improve. Were always open to critique from our residents. 

It’s also Earth Day and we wish peace for all life on this wonderful, miraculous planet, regardless of the form it takes. ❤️

https://salsa4.salsalabs.com/o/51586/donate_page/donate?track=Website_Donate_Page_Link

Comment on Facebook

That is just hilarious, also scary but I suppose April decided she was the boss after all. We have beautiful rain today to nourish this precious earth.

What a clever bear. She's gonna make for a good momma one day. She's got mad skills. Happy Sunday everyone.

Oh my goodness "Clever" April Bear (new name). Today the roof tomorrow the trees.

Glad she didn't re-injure her ribs with that squeeze up to the "sun roof".

Oh those crazy and clever cubbies! Happy 15 months, April. 💖💖💖💖

Happy 15th Birthday April. She is looking very well today.

April you know your stuff! LOL! Happy Birthday April❤️❤️🎂

What a clever girl!

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ABR Update #3-April 21, 2018

April Bear had a very busy day. She's curled up on her new bed, fast asleep. We wish her and you a good night. 😴
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ABR Update #3-April 21, 2018

April Bear had a very busy day. Shes curled up on her new bed, fast asleep. We wish her and you a good night. 😴

Comment on Facebook

Those arrows will soon need another vacation.

How many beds has she gone through? 🤣😂

So when April Bear trashes her bed, she’s practicing making a nest for little bears some cold day in the future.

Good night, April. Good night, Arrows. 💘

I take it April has come to appreciate her comfy bed?

April I went to sleep before you, did not get to tell you good night. 😘

Goodnight April Bear and all at ABR.

❤️ Goodnight sweet April bear, arrows, Janet, Jake & Lucy, Ben, David, Coy et al. Happy dreams! 💤😴

Well April bear youve had one very busy Day, well its nightime, sooo Nighty Night, Sweet Dreams April bear! Everyone at BCR! ☺🐻❤💛💙💖💚💛💜

Sweet dreams April Bear 🐻 dream little bear dreams😘💜🐻💤

See ya tomorrow April Bear ❤️❤️

Sweet dreams April Bear🐻💤

"Non-trashed bed". That's an important update right there, and my most favorite one. Good night, all.

What a comfy little home! <3

Good night April, pleasant dreams💜💜💜💜

Good night sweet angel ♥️♥️🐾🐻

Goodnight sweet April Bear. 💖

Good night April bear❤

Nite nite April <3

nite nite sweet girl

Good night, snoozy April. <3

Sweet Dreams April 💜

Good night April bear

💕. Sweet bear dreams...

She was tired!!

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18 hours ago

Appalachian Bear Rescue

Curator Janet's report.

Black bears are very opportunistic eaters. Most of their diet consists of grasses, roots, berries, nuts, and insects. As much as possible, we try to provide our bears with natural, seasonal foods. While fruits, berries, and nuts can be easy to acquire, accumulating enough of certain types of grasses and insects can be challenging. In addition, the task of keeping a yearling's natural curiosity and penchant for a bit of mischief at bay can add to that challenge. As curators, we try to "think outside the box," often going to extremes for our bears. From raiding the school playground of dandelions (with the assistance of helpful elementary kids), to knocking down hornets' nests, to a helpful volunteer (Pat Chrisman) raising meal worms, we will go to extremes to take care of our bears.

A perfect example of this is Chef David, formerly known as Curator David, who, came up with a delectable delicacy for our resident, April Bear. David's honey log was such a success, he and Coy set out to make it better. With help from Colton Blair and his gecko, who donated the insects, the guys concocted a Honey Worm Log, which is sure to be a bear favorite. The well-prepared, scrumptious log was served up and met with April's approval. In fact, she gave it a rating of "two paws up." We must emphasize, however, that our curators are April's personal chefs; the ABR Diner is not open for business, nor are we soliciting random, walk-in customers. April Bear demonstrated her approval by leaving David and Coy a large tip. As for me, I think I will just stick to picking dandelion leaves and knocking down hornets' nests! No tip necessary!

Thank you for your support of Appalachian Bear Rescue. salsa4.salsalabs.com/o/51586/donate_page/donate?track=Website_Donate_Page_Link
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Curator Janets report.  

Black bears are very opportunistic eaters. Most of their diet consists of grasses, roots, berries, nuts, and insects.  As much as possible, we try to provide our bears with natural, seasonal foods.  While fruits, berries, and nuts can be easy to acquire, accumulating enough of certain types of grasses and insects can be challenging.  In addition, the task of keeping a yearlings natural curiosity and penchant for a bit of mischief at bay can add to that challenge.  As curators, we try to think outside the box, often going to extremes for our bears.  From raiding the school playground of dandelions (with the assistance of helpful elementary kids), to knocking down hornets nests, to a helpful volunteer (Pat Chrisman) raising meal worms, we will go to extremes to take care of our bears.

A perfect example of this is Chef David, formerly known as Curator David, who, came up with a delectable delicacy for our resident, April Bear.  Davids honey log was such a success, he and Coy set out to make it better.  With help from Colton Blair and his gecko, who donated the insects, the guys concocted a Honey Worm Log, which is sure to be a bear favorite.  The well-prepared, scrumptious log was served up and met with Aprils approval.  In fact, she gave it a rating of two paws up.  We must emphasize, however, that our curators are Aprils personal chefs; the ABR Diner is not open for business, nor are we soliciting random, walk-in customers.  April Bear demonstrated her approval by leaving David and Coy a large tip.  As for me, I think I will just stick to picking dandelion leaves and knocking down hornets nests!  No tip necessary!

Thank you for your support of Appalachian Bear Rescue.  https://salsa4.salsalabs.com/o/51586/donate_page/donate?track=Website_Donate_Page_Link

Comment on Facebook

Chef David sure is a whiz with a power drill! His inventiveness continues to amaze & astound 👍 Ok I give up—what are the dandelions for? 🤔 I don’t recall seeing them mentioned before.

Darn, I was going to come by for lunch soon. Maybe Chef David could score some side work catering. Seriously, I am so grateful to all of you at ABR for all you do for these precious babies.

Chef David, I really wanted an order of honey worm lov! You must consider opening a restaurant! 😂😂

April is so fortunate to have such caring loving care-takers as all of you at ABR! Thank you for helping her while she stays with you! Love all the things you teach us!!

I so enjoy your reporting, Curator Janet...humorous and informative

Curator David should have a blog with instructions on how to entertain guests. I would be a follower.

Thank you all for giving April a great smorgasbord. I know she appreciates everything you have done for her.

Good job Coy. Did April tip nicely😜

Very cool. And hornet's nests? Are there hornets in them? (I shudder at the thought.)

Turning down a bear fresh tip unbelievable. Pls show more gratotide for all the effort and sacrifices those baby cubbies go through just so they can leave you something personal for you to remember them saying good by and thank you as they rolled out the door.. Has there ever been a tree with bees creating Honey in your area. Its not common but it does happen, the other trick was a sugar water left on a stump and the bees will make a continuous line from the water to the tree. At least you would find honey and there is the possibility of using the tree itself, that part which is infected.

Bravo to all of you for yor dedication to black bears and education of the public.

Curator/Principal/Dr Janet Is The Coolest

That was the biggest laugh of my day - thanks, Curator Janet!! Good to know just how effective the Honey Worm Log was. 🙂

If I were a bear I'd eat it up!

No good deed goes unpunished!🤣

I'm so thankful yall provide them with a variety.

thank you but no thank you! I'm glad I'm not a bear 🤮

Absolutely delightful, informative to the nth degree, well done, cooperative learning team challenge winners. Let's hear it for large tips! ATTENTION: I am assuming youall have heard about the Romaine situation.

You guys are awesome. Ever had any sightings of info on Finnegan bear?

U guys at ABR...U R THE BEST....#1 BEAR RESCUE IN THE 🌎.

Huge thanks to all the creative dedicated bear loving people! You all Rock!!!!

Thanks everyone for all your dedicated hard work for these beautiful bears <3

You guys and your wonderful volunteers sure know how to keep April happy and well fed.

(y)

Lol!!!

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1 day ago

Appalachian Bear Rescue

We can say Curator Coy’s new and improved Honey Log is a hit! April Bear shows us how much she loves it by doing just what a black bear should; she’s shredding the outer log to get at the superworms (fat meal worms) and honeycomb inside. She's using her sharp claws and her very long tongue to retrieve the tasty morsels buried within and has had hours of fun doing it. Thank you for helping us help her return to the wild.😊

*The ABR Website is undergoing much-needed maintenance. It will be up and running again by Monday, April 23, 2018. Thank you for your patience.
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We can say Curator Coy’s new and improved Honey Log is a hit! April Bear shows us how much she loves it by doing just what a black bear should; she’s shredding the outer log to get at the superworms (fat meal worms) and honeycomb inside. Shes using her sharp claws and her very long tongue to retrieve the tasty morsels buried within and has had hours of fun doing it. Thank you for helping us help her return to the wild.😊

*The ABR Website is undergoing much-needed maintenance. It will be up and running again by Monday, April 23, 2018. Thank you for your patience.

Comment on Facebook

Curator Coy--at least as smart as your average bear! Is there a Yogi Bear award for Curator Coy (smarter than your average bear?).

Do mealworms have a smell? Can she smell them in addition to the honey?

i think Curator Coy must be part bear himself. He understands bears so well and comes up with the best ideas. Curator Coy Bear!

She is going to turn into Super Milo and never ever leave this place. She must think right now that bear adulting is really simple.

Even the emails are better when speaking of the half curator half bear-man Coy. Ingenious with the honey log full of superworms and all that wonderful wood to shred. It’s enough to make a retired English teacher forget how to write sentences. Thanks Coy and all.

So glad April is tolerating confinement and recovery so well! Honey logs and toys like balls go a long way to relieve boredom. Thanks, ABR, for taking such good care of her. Don’t know how you’re going to top the new and improved honey log!

April is a HONEY POT 🍯

No need to worry! We understand that web maintenance is a necessary evil 😉

Honey Logs sound good but I will let April Bear have my worms!!!! Stay strong little one!!!

<3 She's a special girl <3..her ability to go from wild and alone one day to confined and restricted the next amazes me..I know the medication, at first, helped blur the walls but medication is finished! and she's not demanding to be released?.. She's actually loving the safeness..sleeping without being eaten alive by bugs while clinging to a tree..food deliveries with added surprises..new surroundings and things to play with.. she's a pampered little princess and LOVing it 🙂 ..on her roughest days out there she'll forever have these good times to remember and dream about..I wish you a long stress free- safe life out there Princess April <3 🐻

Love the arrows pointing to the front end and back end! 😄🐻

Look forward to seeing Your website on Monday. Thanks for letting us know that nothing is wrong when we don't see you up tomorrow.

Love that she's so relaxed and secure that she can expose her belly!

She is so precious. Thank you for keeping her occupied while in confinement. She seems to be doing well thanks to ABR!!!❤❤❤

Better the honey wormy log than her bed!

Logs are go!!! X uk

My dose of cubby was a success as always TY ABR

Thank you, Curator Coy, for being so ingenious and creative for the bears!

She looks so sweet, but is she dangerous to you all ?

She looks like she's having a great time.

You go April get your treat

Great job Curator Coy!

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ABR Update-April 21, 2018

Our website is currently under maintenance. It should be up and running again by Monday, April 23, 2018. We'll post an update on April Bear later today. Thank you for your patience. 🙂
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ABR Update-April 21, 2018

Our website is currently under maintenance. It should be up and running again by Monday, April 23, 2018.  Well post an update on April Bear later today. Thank you for your patience. :)

Comment on Facebook

Love what you do for the Bear's. And for sharing daily pictures and updates on your "Guest's".

Thank you for all your wonderful work & up to dates you sent out. Have a blessed day everyone.

That bear looks like it is doing some "maintenance" on that tree! 😂

COME BAAAAACK!!!!!

🌞 nice day for April to play out-of-doors 😍

💕

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2 days ago

Appalachian Bear Rescue

Curator Coy spoke with the vets today. They’re pleased with April's progress, but would like her to spend one more week in The Red Roof Recovery Center. The plan is to transfer her from the Recovery Center to an Outdoor Acclimation pen to complete her recuperation. As always, it will be April who decides if she’ll cooperate for a few more days.

The curators are constantly devising ways to keep her amused. Today, Curator Coy surprised our resident yearling with a special treat…a Honey Log, but not your run-of-the-mill honey log, but "The Curator Coy, New and Improved" version containing honeycomb AND superworms, large mealworm-like grubs bears find delicious. April sure did.

ABR friend, Judy, asked why ABR is restricted to rescue bears two years of age or younger?

In the early 1990’s, there was a need to help orphaned or injured black bear cubs and yearlings. Bears that young can’t survive on their own and used to be euthanized because there was nowhere to send them. In a given season, there are usually far more cubs who need rescue than injured adults(a mother bear can have three or four cubs in a single litter). This need led to the creation of ABR and our facility was built specifically for cubs and yearlings. It isn’t suitable or safe for adult bears. Cubs and yearlings are capable of being housed together; adult bears lead a largely solitary life and would have to be sheltered individually. We couldn’t have adult females in estrus in the same area as adult males and we couldn’t have orphaned cubs anywhere near either. Giving the youngest bears a second chance at life in the wild is the best we can do. At present, there is nothing like ABR for bears older than two years of age. They are treated case-by-case; If there’s a chance they can recover on their own, they’re left alone. If short-term medical intervention can help, they’re sent to UT vet school. Otherwise, they are euthanized.

If you have any questions, please email us at
appbearrescue@gmail.com

salsa4.salsalabs.com/o/51586/donate_page/donate?track=Website_Donate_Page_Link
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Curator Coy spoke with the vets today. They’re pleased with Aprils progress, but would like her to spend one more week in The Red Roof Recovery Center. The plan is to transfer her from the Recovery Center to an  Outdoor Acclimation pen to complete her recuperation. As always, it will be April who decides if she’ll cooperate for a few more days.

The curators are constantly devising ways to keep her amused. Today, Curator Coy surprised our resident yearling with a special treat…a Honey Log, but not your run-of-the-mill honey log, but The Curator Coy, New and Improved version containing honeycomb AND superworms, large mealworm-like grubs bears find delicious. April sure did. 

ABR friend, Judy, asked why ABR is restricted to rescue bears two years of age or younger? 

In the early 1990’s, there was a need to help orphaned or injured black bear cubs and yearlings. Bears that young can’t survive on their own and used to be euthanized because there was nowhere to send them. In a given season, there are usually far more cubs who need rescue than injured adults(a mother bear can have three or four cubs in a single litter). This need led to the creation of ABR and our facility was built specifically for cubs and yearlings. It isn’t suitable or safe for adult bears. Cubs and yearlings are capable of being housed together; adult bears lead a largely solitary life and would have to be sheltered individually. We couldn’t have adult females in estrus in the same area as adult males and we couldn’t have orphaned cubs anywhere near either. Giving the youngest bears a second chance at life in the wild is the best we can do. At present, there is nothing like ABR for bears older than two years of age. They are treated case-by-case; If there’s a chance they can recover on their own, they’re left alone. If short-term medical intervention can help, they’re sent to UT vet school. Otherwise, they are euthanized. 

If you have any questions, please email us at 
appbearrescue@gmail.com

https://salsa4.salsalabs.com/o/51586/donate_page/donate?track=Website_Donate_Page_Link

Comment on Facebook

Hard to read the paragraph about the older bears in need. 😥

Arrows must be on vacation today 😜

David, Tom, Coy and Janet are so wonderfully imaginative in creating new ways to keep April entertained & busy! She seems to be truly content during her enforced confinement. Is her ball outside or did it get taken away? I wonder if she will drag her log outside.

Happy to hear April continues to heal. Did she visit the vet or was the additional week based on curators' observations, film and urine/poop examination? Glad Curator Coy is so inventive and imaginative, he knows what the babies like; thank you, Coy. Is the two year old age limit forged by some state wildlife agency or is it as you clearly state, older bears do not have a specific place to go? The magnitude of rehabilitating older bears is enormous, even tiny cubs huff and puff!

ABR specializes in cubs, and the cubs have top of the line care they would otherwise not have. We can hope and pray that at some point something more will be developed for adult bears far away from the ABR location so cubs and adults will be safe. Love that ABR exists and has such dedicated, highly creative and resourceful professionals to care for the cubs from capture to release and in some cases beyond...

So sad about the older Cubs . But sure are thankful for ABR and to our mission! What would happen if one of our bears you released needed attention say when they were over 2 years old. They are tagged so would you be contacted ABR?

Difficult to contain an animal whos life is always moving and climbing. She does not know it is for the best. Hard choices guys---you will win through for her♡. Xxx uk

Big yum on those superworms! I’ll bet she has met superworms before. I’m so impressed with the ways you keep April occupied and learning with her food. Thanks for all ABR does.

Thank you for the information about the older bears.... It makes sense....thank you guys for all you do for these cubbies.... You are appreciated more than you know.... I hope you have a great weekend April Bear and all the ABR staff and volunteers!!!!

Thanks for the info on why ABR was developed. Life for bears is such a challenge. 🙁

Thank you so much for answering my question! ❤️ I remember, now, reading this information over the years. I just needed a refresher course. I may need another one in a few weeks. 😂 y’all do such an amazing thing for these special little bears. Along with UTCVM!

Sadly, we must accept our human limitations.

Thanks for the thorough explanation. I would guess cubs and yearlings get into trouble (out in the wild 🙂 ) more often than adult bears. Yes, sad about adult bears, and that would be a big project for anyone to start up. Thanks again for ALL you do!!!

Love ABR.... ....

I love the way you work.

April is being a star pupil! And the delux honey log with all the tasty bugs made her day I’m sure!

You go April girl!

Lynne Hasenkamp this is the bear rescue I was telling you about. Highly recommend!

Interesting. Thank you

(y)

Would love to take care of them All.

Good night Miss April! Looks like you had a very good day!

Glad to hear that

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2 days ago

Appalachian Bear Rescue

Head Curator, Coy Blair, and Assistant Curators, Janet Dalton, Tom Faulkner and David Whitehead are a busy bunch. Their duties aren’t confined to the care of our furry residents; they’re also deeply committed to educating the public about black bears and ABR’s mission: “to care for orphaned and injured black bears, two years of age or younger, for eventual release back to the wild”. Yesterday, Curators Coy and David had the pleasure of presenting our mission to a group of 30 individuals from Fairview United Methodist Seniors Group from Blount County, TN at our Visitor and Education Center in Trillium Cove. Curator Coy reports: “Half the group went with Curator David, and the other half went with me. We explained how ABR cares for bears from neonates to yearlings and gets them back into the wild. We also discussed research and how we partner with other agencies regarding educating folks about black bears. The group had great questions and seemed to enjoy our presentations.” We’re grateful to these ladies and gentlemen for choosing to spend time with ABR.

The end of the presentation didn’t mean the end of the working day for ABR personnel. Coy, Tom and David were back at the facility putting finishing touches on their latest project: a Tire Bridge for Wild Enclosure #1. Taking care of bears means more than just feeding them; captivity, even in the short-term, can be stressful on wild animals. The Tire Bridge gives them something to do and, no doubt, some fun.

April Bear, our sole resident, is in the Outdoor Acclimation Pen enjoying the fresh air. The curators have another duty; cleaning her room. April leaves plenty of “calling cards” for them, and they indicate a healthy digestive system. A great deal can be learned from examining bear scat. From it, biologists can infer what the food supply is like in the wild, how much there is, even where the bear roamed to find it. For example, scat with lots of blueberries skins where there are no blueberries might indicate the bear roamed miles to find them. Scat found in the fall containing only grass, might indicate a famine in the deep woods.
Regardless of its importance, neither we (or the arrows) envy this chore. We're grateful to leave it to the professionals.

Thank you for following our “poopy bear” on her journey back to the wild. We appreciate every “like”, every share and every comment.

salsa4.salsalabs.com/o/51586/donate_page/donate?track=Website_Donate_Page_LinkApril Bear's copious calling cards
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Head Curator, Coy Blair, and Assistant Curators, Janet Dalton, Tom Faulkner and David Whitehead are a busy bunch. Their duties aren’t confined to the care of our furry residents; they’re also deeply committed to educating the public about black bears and ABR’s mission: “to care for orphaned and injured black bears, two years of age or younger, for eventual release back to the wild”. Yesterday, Curators Coy and David had the pleasure of presenting our mission to a group of 30 individuals from Fairview United Methodist Seniors Group from Blount County, TN at our Visitor and Education Center in Trillium Cove.  Curator Coy reports: “Half the group went with Curator David, and the other half went with me.  We explained how ABR cares for bears from neonates to yearlings and gets them back into the wild.  We also discussed research and how we partner with other agencies regarding educating folks about black bears.  The group had great questions and seemed to enjoy our presentations.” We’re grateful to these ladies and gentlemen for choosing to spend time with ABR. 

The end of the presentation didn’t mean the end of the working day for ABR personnel. Coy, Tom and David were back at the facility putting finishing touches on their latest project: a Tire Bridge for Wild Enclosure #1. Taking care of bears means more than just feeding them; captivity, even in the short-term, can be stressful on wild animals. The Tire Bridge gives them something to do and, no doubt, some fun.

April Bear, our sole resident, is in the Outdoor Acclimation Pen enjoying the fresh air. The curators have another duty; cleaning her room. April leaves plenty of “calling cards” for them, and they indicate a healthy digestive system. A great deal can be learned from examining bear scat.  From it, biologists can infer what the food supply is like in the wild, how much there is, even where the bear roamed to find it. For example, scat with lots of blueberries skins where there are no blueberries might indicate the bear roamed miles to find them. Scat found in the fall containing only grass, might indicate a famine in the deep woods. 
Regardless of its importance, neither we (or the arrows) envy this chore. Were grateful to leave it to the professionals. 

Thank you for following our “poopy bear” on her journey back to the wild. We appreciate every “like”, every share and every comment. 

https://salsa4.salsalabs.com/o/51586/donate_page/donate?track=Website_Donate_Page_LinkApril Bears copious calling cards

Comment on Facebook

I know this has been answered before, but I just can't remember the answer: Why is the cut-off age 2 year old bears? Thank you! And thank you for all you do for our young bears!

For such a little bear April certainly leaves a pile,Love the tyre bridge,haven't seen anyone testing it,does David Whitehead not like heights 😁

We could use your expertize in Eugene, OR. There was a security tape of a bear looking for food in a backyard in the hills. The residents were on vacation. Bears here are not relocated. 🙁

What an awesome place with equally amazing crew!! Loved the tour I went on, very impressed! Thank you for all you do for our Smoky bears!!!❤🐻

Janet Dalton, was great to “see” you at the Wildlife for You webinar this week! Can’t wait for the next one!

Too bad they can’t be litter box trained! 😂😂

From Central Indiana appreciate those great shots of curators against re-birth of flora. We are just budding and low growing greening out. Hoping for a great Mast for all life. My fave persimmons and black walnuts.

You all do a wonderful job, keep it up. God Bless.

Thanks for explaining what exactly April's scat fertilizes. 🙂

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ABR Update #2-April 19, 2018

We've waited all evening for Ms. April to come inside. Just when we were about to give up hope, she paused at the doorway just long enough for this poor photo. She's had a good day, though her bed can't say the same. She trashed it. Nevermind, it can be replaced. We wish April and you a good night. 😴
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ABR Update #2-April 19, 2018

Weve waited all evening for Ms. April to come inside. Just when we were about to give up hope, she paused at the doorway just long enough for this poor photo. Shes had a good day, though her bed cant say the same. She trashed it. Nevermind, it can be replaced. We wish April and you a good night. 😴

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Good night little spunky pants💜😘🐻 good night to all y’all;)

Bed, shmed. She got one more good day in recovery!

Milo had his stump, Miss April has her long line of torn up beds. Sweet dreams, April Bear!

I would ask if there is such a thing as a bear-proof bed, but I've seen what a bear can do to a car . . . inside and outside. So that would be a no.

Any news on climbing. Like raising her roof.

😂 I’m surprised the bed lasted this long! Time for the curators to add in another new toy or two! Happy dreams to April, Ben and curators. 😴

I believe she now holds the record for thrashed beds. She probably now needs a hay nest. Good night, April, good night all.

Trashing her bed must be a good sign that she has enough energy. Not good for bed tho!! Thanks for the update. April will be wanting to spend more time outdoors as it gets warmer. Lucky her to have a choice!!

If I were April, I might also be in love with anything outside the cage.

maybe she'd like one of the culvert dens that the others ignored in her outdoor room when the ceiling goes up a notch..or one of those giant tires to climb on/in..giant stuffed animals to wrestle/tear apart /chewy toys that are hard to destroy/homemade frozen honey peanut butter rings/frozen fruit bars..just trying to think of things to keep her busy another 30 days so she doesnt want OUT sooner than needed..Glad she's done so well these past 2 weeks 🙂 hope after follow up visit shes cleared to climb a little before being released and gets to enjoy larger 2 level acclimation pen 🐻😍and a pool 🙂

After a Long day outside, little girl sleep well tonight......Nite All, sweet dreams everyone 🙏🏼

Well April looks like your totaling your bed Princess, well April bear youve got to sleep on something comfy, warm April, but I'm soo happy to see that your soo active, eating good, but that bed.. ??

Good night, Miss April!

Well said by all.

Good night sleep tight miss April.

Goodnight April Bear. 🐻♥️💤

Thank goodness for blue Arrows 💙 Sleep well precious April💕🐻😍

One more bed down 😃 sweet dreams April

On The Animal Planet Show The Zoo The Bronx Zoo Keepers made a bed for a polar bear out of heavy duty PVC Pipe or Heavy duty steel tubing and fire hose and wove it together....real ingenuity....im sure you guys could figure out something equally as ingenious

Good night!

Too bad y’all can’t make a “bear proof” bed! 😂 She’s having her fun though and that’s what matters

April must be getting bored, trashing her bed again! Good night April Bear!

Good night April bear!

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ABR Update-April 19, 2018-The Omnivorous April

April, like all her kind, is omnivorous; she will eat almost anything. Black bear diet in the wild is largely plant, fruit, nut and insect-based, but they will eat meat when they can, usually in the form of very young, injured/ sick animals or carrion. We received a couple of interesting questions regarding black bear diet: Do bears eat potatoes? Do bears eat oranges and other citrus fruit?

Our current curators have never fed potatoes to our residents, but they think bears would eat them. Bears eat the roots of certain plants and their claws are designed to dig and shred as well as climb. But oranges stumped us, so Curator Janet contacted a colleague in Florida, “The Orange State”, to ask about their local bears. “Typically they [black bears] aren't big on oranges, grapefruit, etc. Maybe a few, occasionally, but that's not typical. Loquats and kumquats, yes. They are a decent attractant for them.”

We wouldn’t expect a bear to gorge on oranges as it would on apples. We think the bitter rind would discourage it and large quantities of citric acid would irritate its mouth and stomach. However, we’ve learned over the years to qualify our remarks; as soon as we make a definitive statement about bear behavior, some bear somewhere will raise its paw, clear its throat and prove us wrong. So, we’ll say that bears can eat potatoes but would not normally choose to eat oranges, grapefruits etc. How’s that for equivocation! 😀

April had a good night and is resting near her bed and her ball. She’s doing well and we wish her and you a very good day. 🐻
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ABR Update-April 19, 2018-The Omnivorous April

April, like all her kind, is omnivorous; she will eat almost anything. Black bear diet in the wild is largely plant, fruit, nut and insect-based, but they will eat meat when they can, usually in the form of very young, injured/ sick animals or carrion. We received a couple of interesting questions regarding black bear diet: Do bears eat potatoes? Do bears eat oranges and other citrus fruit? 

Our current curators have never fed potatoes to our residents, but they think bears would eat them. Bears eat the roots of certain plants and their claws are designed to dig and shred as well as climb. But oranges stumped us, so Curator Janet contacted a colleague in Florida, “The Orange State”, to ask about their local bears. “Typically they [black bears] arent big on oranges, grapefruit, etc. Maybe a few, occasionally, but thats not typical. Loquats and kumquats, yes. They are a decent attractant for them.”   

We wouldn’t expect a bear to gorge on oranges as it would on apples. We think the bitter rind would discourage it and large quantities of citric acid would irritate its mouth and stomach. However, we’ve learned over the years to qualify our remarks; as soon as we make a definitive statement about bear behavior, some bear somewhere will raise its paw, clear its throat and prove us wrong. So, we’ll say that bears can eat potatoes but would not normally choose to eat oranges, grapefruits etc. How’s that for equivocation! 😀

April had a good night and is resting near her bed and her ball. She’s doing well and we wish her and you a very good day.  🐻
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Your response is just about exactly what I thought it would be. Makes perfect sense. Toss a raw potato in and see how April reacts to it. Better yet, throw her a baked potato (cooled of course). Now THAT would be a true test since a baked tater tastes SO good. LOL

On behalf of some beautiful moon bears that I know, I'll raise a paw and say that these bears love oranges. I only give them one once or twice a week when I'm with them, but they really enjoy them and take some time in scratching out every morsel of the delicious flesh. Some of them just break the orange open immediately with their paws and claws and start sucking the juice, others squash it with their paws. So funny, they are all unique individuals, as you well know with all the little bears that you have rescued. 😋 I tried to insert a photo but can't find any way to do it. 🤨

Childrens Literary geek moment : There is a wonderful book ‘Blueberries for Sal’ written by Robert McCloskey (1949 Caldecott winner) about a girl who picks Blueberries and the Bear family who also enjoys the berries where she finds them. Bear /wildlife aficionados with children, check it out. 👍🏻🐻❤️

We have observed that orange rind is one of the few human foods bears don’t eat.

We live in an area with many bears. I have wondered why they don’t seem interested in veggies like tomatoes, green beans, etc that people commonly grow. Thoughts?

I’m so glad that April continues to thrive in her temporary “den”. I do wonder what exactly she thinks about her ball and the attachment she formed with it.

What about native paw paw fruit?

For what it's worth...the locals here will pick the potato skins out of the compost pile when the other pickins are slim. 😀

Appalachian Bear Rescue, with Miss April's birthday coming up, can we expect a Ken LaValley portrait of her? I'm looking forward to seeing her face instead of just the top of her head and back. I'm not complaining, love seeing the daily pictures of her. Just wondering.

I'm happy April is doing so well. I know my dogs hates anything citrus you can show them the rind and they run. Maybe it's the same way with them. Have a fun day April I love you.

Good night Sweetheart have a good sleep! Your ear tag matches you ball 😘💚💚💚

I love that she loves her ball!!! It will have to get retired when April leaves like Mother Bunny did 🙂

Much like my Fox’s. They make use of anything. April appears to be moving around very well. When do the vets say she should be ready to climb?

Love that she finds comfort in a bright green ball

April, seem to be easy going. I'm thinking she might not won't to leave this life. After she had a hissy with her bed. She is like on vacation, relaxing & anything goes. This is a blessing for everyone. Thank you for update, have a nice day.

Beautiful April Bear ❤️

Like any animal in the wild, bears will probably eat anything if hungry enough. I saw two feral cats (mom and baby) eating cracked corn. I immediately went out and bought them some proper food, and they became loving pets. Deer will eat just about any overripe fruit or vegetable we toss out -- oranges, pumpkin (everything but the stem), corn on the cob (corn only, not the cob), broccoli, bananas (including peels). I spotted white things in my neighbor's yard and found that they had tossed out potatoes which the deer ate.

Hope you have had a WONDERFUL day, sweet April Bear. ❤

Thank you Trish Stevens for info on book. 🐻❤

Thank you for answering my question about citrus fruits. I am always amazed by what bears eat and how they eat only what is ripe and return night after night to eat the newly ripened berries. So now I know that they are not keen on citrus but if really hungry that probably would not turn their nose up at it.Sorry about the bed. Maybe one made out of Kevlar might do it. I know she has to be getting bored. Again thank you for you answers.

Wishing April and each of you a good day also 🖤❣ she really likes her ball 💜

It makes perfect sense to me!☺️

Happy for Miss April recovering so well! Thank you ABR!

Test well April❤

💕.

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