Daily Bear Updates

3 hours ago

Appalachian Bear Rescue

Update on ABR #282 - Hartley Bear.
{Warning: Some images are graphic!}
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I bet he is kin to some of the Big South Fork Bears. I was the lead biologist that did the reintroduction there with the Park Service. I maybe brought his great great grandmother there! LOL

As soon as he shreds his bed we will know he’s better.

Is Mother Bunny around for him ?

Hey Janet, since the skin scrape came up negative for mites do the vets have an idea what has caused the hair loss?

Thank you for taking time to update us via FB live Janet, he’s in the best place he can be.

I know he's a wild beast who could swat my face off, but I still want to kiss his precious naked snout.

Thank you to the man who found him and contacted the right people to save him!

He’s beautiful and I believe a survivor....hang in there Hartley. Thank you Janet

is momma bunny with him

Since he's so little for a yearling will you keep him longer than other yearlings? At what weight will you think about releasing him back into the wild.

It’s lucky he was found and brought to you

Poor baby brought tears to my eyes too bless his heart

Praise God someone found him in time to save his life! ❤️❤️❤️

The wildlife folks in my area just rescued a yearling pretty much in the same shape, but not the fur loss. Sadly, they haven’t done any updates.

Will he have a Mother Bunny? Or something similar?

An absolute miracle he was able to survive on his own for so long and wonderful that such good people found him and are now taking care of him. Bless you all.

Hi Janet, I was just hoping for a live video. So glad to hear your voice and to see Hartley. Has he reacted to your presence?

Hartley is a strong little bear. I feel he is going to be a big chubby little bear soon with all the TLC he is experiencing at ABR. Bless you all💓🐻

That actually happened with the holocaust survivors when they were liberated in WWII. They didn’t realize at first they needed to ration their food...

I’ve missed having a little bear but didn’t want one so sick. Glad to see him a little more active. Thank you so much for what you do.

That is so surprising Janet. If he's the most pitiful looking after all the bears you have seen. OMG. Welled up at that. Julie

We are all going to get very attached to him. ❤️He is in good hands, but he will be in those good hands for a while now Looking forward to all the updates as he grows and gets better.

Is it possible he has siblings wandering out there in the same shape? If so, is anyone looking for them?

Oh my goodness...I can’t believe he is even moving around in his condition! Rest up and heal little Hartley.

Can't wait until you can give him a toy friend to keep him company. I remember the rabbit and how much cubby loved it and didn't want to part with it until you had to take it from the cub :)

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5 hours ago

Appalachian Bear Rescue

2004 began with the first bear arriving in January and the gift of a new office trailer from Mountain National Bank. A crew, which included our own Tom Faulkner, demolished the old one and prepared the site for the new one. The new curator, Lisa Stewart, now with one year behind her, would face new challenges in the coming year which began on January 25th with the arrival of a small bear who would make a big impression on a lot of people.

ABC 55 - Copperfield
On January 25, 2004, a small bear was spotted in a tree in a Townsend resident's backyard after gun shots had been heard. After 1 1/2 days, the mother had not returned. The residents became worried because there were large dogs in the area who had noticed the little bear in the tree. When the resident approached the tree, the bear descended into his arms. Knowing this was not normal bear behavior, the resident placed him in a crate and transported him to ABR. The little yearling weighed only 16 lbs.. The yearling was placed into a holding area in the enclosure to be monitored closely, but he escaped through an opening in the roof, thus the name "Copperfield." He found his way into the large enclosure and climbed the first oak tree he found, letting Curator Lisa Stewart know he had no need for her holding pen. In the wild enclosure, Copperfield behaved like a normal yearling; hiding in dens and behind logs, and disappearing in a flash when the curator was around. He spent his days high in the treetops and descended at night to eat.

On May 10th, a ceremonial signing of a Dam Relicensing Settlement Agreement with Alcoa Power Generating Inc. was held at Calderwood Overlook, which in part, called for the protection of some 10,000 acres of mountain land between the GSMNP and both Cherokee and Nantahala national forests. The event was attended by politicians, conservationists, and bureaucrats. This seven-year agreement was long-awaited, but we believe we can say with certainty that the highlight of the event was Copperfield performing his final disappearing act as he was released back to the wild weighing a healthy 59 lbs..

ABC #56 - Porky
On March 13th, a bear cub who had been observed for 2-3 days behind Timbers restaurant in Townsend was brought to ABC. After several attempts, TWRA Officer David Sexton captured the cub after a dog treed it at a nearby residence, by luring it down with bacon, hence the name "Porky." The cub weighed 8.6 lbs. and after a brief observation in a holding pen, joined Copperfield in the wild enclosure to spend his days asleep in the treetops. Porky quickly gained weight and became the largest of the Class of 2004 cubs, weighing 125 lbs. at his release on September 14th, 2004.

ABC #57 - Li'l Lucky
On April 6th, TWRA Officer David Brandenburg transported a 5 lb. orphaned cub from Cocke County, TN. Officer Brandenburg had exhausted all efforts to locate a surrogate mother in the wild. Writing about the little male cub, Lisa Stewart described him as a "spitfire" who was a bundle of energy...all paws and claws! One year earlier, Officer Brandenburg had brought Lucky (ABC #49) to ABC, so the little bundle energy was named Li'l Lucky. Getting Li'l Lucky to eat was a challenge as he refused bottles of formula. Lisa tried changing the nipple styles several times, but the little cub refused to take the bottle. Finally, she tried syringe feeding and was successful. Li'l Lucky was too small to join Copperfield and Porky, but soon would have playmates his own size. He was released on September 16th weighing 69.4 lbs.

ABC #58 & 59 - Louis and Ana
In late April, Maria Davidson, an officer with the LA Dept. of Wildlife and Fisheries called about two cubs that had been confiscated from an individual who was illegally possessing them. Having originated from another state, the cubs were not of the black bear subspecies that comprises Louisiana's wild bear population and thus, could not be released in LA and would have to be placed in a captive facility. In agreement with TWRA, the cubs were transferred to ABC in order to have a chance at being released to a wild population. After a long, 10-hour drive, the hungry cubs arrived at ABC. The male cub (Louis) weighed 15.4 lbs. and the female (Ana) weighed 9.2 lbs. They joined Li'l Lucky in the holding pen and were ecstatic with their new playmate. For the next four months, the cubs wrestled, climbed trees, and grew in excess of 50 lbs. They were released at the Tellico Bear Refuge in mid-September.

ABC #60 - Caroline
Two days after the cubs arrived, South Carolina officers transported a 7 lb. orphaned female to ABC. Dogs had treed the little cub near a grocery store. The cub had a slight head injury, but quickly recovered at ABC and joined Li'l Lucky, Louis, and Ana. Like her enclosure-mates, "Caroline" thrived at ABC and was released in mid-September weighing 51 lbs.

ABC #61 - Chester
In July, 2004, Kim DeLozier called with a report of an underweight yearling (30 lbs.) found at Cataract Falls in the National Park with an injury to a back leg and puncture wounds on his front paws. Having recently been weaned from his mother, it was likely that "Chester" received the injuries as the mother was trying to get him to go off on his own. UT veterinarians performed surgery on Chester to repair a broken femur. He arrived at ABC with a new haircut as 1/3 of his body had to be shaved for surgery. Chester was confined for 6 weeks before being placed in a wild enclosure. He seemed to be progressing well, but as his release date approached, UT veterinarians wanted to examine him before giving him the "all clear" for release. In early November, Chester was transported to UT for radiographs, which revealed more problems with his leg. Chester's release was delay as he had to have a second surgery. Chester now weighed a much healthier 150 lbs. and after returning to ABC, he was once again put in confinement to give his leg every opportunity to heal properly. Chester healed much quicker from his second surgery and in December, was released to the wild enclosure. Without so much as a limp, he darted out of the confinement pen and ran throughout the enclosure. Lisa Stewart described Chester's behavior as "frolicking" and that he was the happiest bear she had ever seen. In order to give Chester every opportunity to recover, the decision was made to keep him over winter and release him in spring. In early April 2005, a 161 lb. Chester was finally released, but this would not be the last ABC would hear of him. By late fall 2004, Kim DeLozier received reports of a bear in an apple tree at The Swag Country Inn in Waynesville, NC. The guests watched in delight as a bear fiercely shook the apple tree until the apples fell to the ground. Then, the bear would lay under the tree and eat till he was full. Although Chester was not becoming a nuisance, his close proximity to people staying at the Inn was a concern; however, after ridding the tree of all its apples, Chester moved on and was never heard from again. Chester's story is a good example of the dedication of our UT veterinarians who take great care of our bears.

ABC #62 - Camper
On the same day that Chester arrived, another underweight yearling was headed to ABC as well. "Camper" was captured in the park near the Chimneys campground and weighed 27 lbs. upon arrival. The small, male yearling was emaciated and was placed in the pen with the cubs already at ABC. The cubs readily accepted Camper and soon they were all playing, eating, and denning together. Camper quickly gained weight and by mid-September, at 89 lbs., he was ready for release. Camper became internationally known as he was the subject of a study by Chinese biologists who were studying the success of the black bear rehabilitation program in the Smokies. The Chinese biologists, along with personnel from the Memphis Zoo, attended Camper's release on September 15, 2004. Bill Stiver raised the sliding door of the transport crate and Camper returned to his natural home totally unaware that he had played an important role in an international black bear conservation effort.

ABC #63 - Ivy
In late August, Officer David Brandenburg called about a sow that had been captured by Park officers at Metcalf Bottoms. The underweight bear was found in a ditch eating poison ivy plants and was visibly weak and starved. Upon arrival at ABC, "Ivy" had no apparent physical injuries that would explain her weakened condition, but weighed only 69 lbs, which was far less than the suitable 150 lbs. she should have weighed. Ivy was placed in the enclosure with Chester. She spent a few days resting, eating, and regaining her strength while she became acclimated to her new surroundings. After a brief competition for "squatting rights," Ivy and Chester became friends and were often observed running, resting in the treetops, and foraging together. When Chester had to be confined for his second surgery, the curator discovered that Ivy and Chester had developed their own special vocalizations so they could communicate, even though they were separated. The GSMNP Superintendent at the time, Dale Ditmanson, visited ABC in October and witnessed Ivy displaying normal black bear behavior, but remarked that he had never heard such vocalizations from a black bear. Lisa Stewart described the melodic sounds Ivy used toward Chester as "singing." On a cold day in late December, a healthy 158 lb. Ivy was released. The freezing temperature didn't bother her at all and realizing she had her freedom again, she bolted from the crate and returned to the wild.

The year began with Copperfield Bear, named for the magician because he loved to disappear and hide from the curator, but at year's end, it seems all the bears were magicians and, at release, performed their own invdividual disappearing act back into the wild. 2004 was another year that displayed the amazing resilience of the bears who overcame a variety of obstacles, and it also tested the resolve of the curator, wildlife officers, and veterinarians. We will continue our study of ABR's history next weekend.

We will also provide updates on our current resident, Hartley Bear throughout the weekend.

Thanks to everyone who supported our Valentine auction or attended the tours last weekend.2004 began with the first bear arriving in January and the gift of a new office trailer from Mountain National Bank. A crew, which included our own Tom Faulkner, demolished the old one and prepared the site for the new one. The new curator, Lisa Stewart, now with one year behind her, would face new challenges in the coming year which began on January 25th with the arrival of a small bear who would make a big impression on a lot of people. ABC 55 - Copperfield On January 25, 2004, a small bear was spotted in a tree in a Townsend resident's backyard after gun shots had been heard. After 1 1/2 days, the mother had not returned. The residents became worried because there were large dogs in the area who had noticed the little bear in the tree. When the resident approached the tree, the bear descended into his arms. Knowing this was not normal bear behavior, the resident placed him in a crate and transported him to ABR. The little yearling weighed only 16 lbs.. The yearling was placed into a holding area in the enclosure to be monitored closely, but he escaped through an opening in the roof, thus the name "Copperfield." He found his way into the large enclosure and climbed the first oak tree he found, letting Curator Lisa Stewart know he had no need for her holding pen. In the wild enclosure, Copperfield behaved like a normal yearling; hiding in dens and behind logs, and disappearing in a flash when the curator was around. He spent his days high in the treetops and descended at night to eat. On May 10th, a ceremonial signing of a Dam Relicensing Settlement Agreement with Alcoa Power Generating Inc. was held at Calderwood Overlook, which in part, called for the protection of some 10,000 acres of mountain land between the GSMNP and both Cherokee and Nantahala national forests. The event was attended by politicians, conservationists, and bureaucrats. This seven-year agreement was long-awaited, but we believe we can say with certainty that the highlight of the event was Copperfield performing his final disappearing act as he was released back to the wild weighing a healthy 59 lbs.. ABC #56 - Porky On March 13th, a bear cub who had been observed for 2-3 days behind Timbers restaurant in Townsend was brought to ABC. After several attempts, TWRA Officer David Sexton captured the cub after a dog treed it at a nearby residence, by luring it down with bacon, hence the name "Porky." The cub weighed 8.6 lbs. and after a brief observation in a holding pen, joined Copperfield in the wild enclosure to spend his days asleep in the treetops. Porky quickly gained weight and became the largest of the Class of 2004 cubs, weighing 125 lbs. at his release on September 14th, 2004. ABC #57 - Li'l Lucky On April 6th, TWRA Officer David Brandenburg transported a 5 lb. orphaned cub from Cocke County, TN. Officer Brandenburg had exhausted all efforts to locate a surrogate mother in the wild. Writing about the little male cub, Lisa Stewart described him as a "spitfire" who was a bundle of energy...all paws and claws! One year earlier, Officer Brandenburg had brought Lucky (ABC #49) to ABC, so the little bundle energy was named Li'l Lucky. Getting Li'l Lucky to eat was a challenge as he refused bottles of formula. Lisa tried changing the nipple styles several times, but the little cub refused to take the bottle. Finally, she tried syringe feeding and was successful. Li'l Lucky was too small to join Copperfield and Porky, but soon would have playmates his own size. He was released on September 16th weighing 69.4 lbs. ABC #58 & 59 - Louis and Ana In late April, Maria Davidson, an officer with the LA Dept. of Wildlife and Fisheries called about two cubs that had been confiscated from an individual who was illegally possessing them. Having originated from another state, the cubs were not of the black bear subspecies that comprises Louisiana's wild bear population and thus, could not be released in LA and would have to be placed in a captive facility. In agreement with TWRA, the cubs were transferred to ABC in order to have a chance at being released to a wild population. After a long, 10-hour drive, the hungry cubs arrived at ABC. The male cub (Louis) weighed 15.4 lbs. and the female (Ana) weighed 9.2 lbs. They joined Li'l Lucky in the holding pen and were ecstatic with their new playmate. For the next four months, the cubs wrestled, climbed trees, and grew in excess of 50 lbs. They were released at the Tellico Bear Refuge in mid-September. ABC #60 - Caroline Two days after the cubs arrived, South Carolina officers transported a 7 lb. orphaned female to ABC. Dogs had treed the little cub near a grocery store. The cub had a slight head injury, but quickly recovered at ABC and joined Li'l Lucky, Louis, and Ana. Like her enclosure-mates, "Caroline" thrived at ABC and was released in mid-September weighing 51 lbs. ABC #61 - Chester In July, 2004, Kim DeLozier called with a report of an underweight yearling (30 lbs.) found at Cataract Falls in the National Park with an injury to a back leg and puncture wounds on his front paws. Having recently been weaned from his mother, it was likely that "Chester" received the injuries as the mother was trying to get him to go off on his own. UT veterinarians performed surgery on Chester to repair a broken femur. He arrived at ABC with a new haircut as 1/3 of his body had to be shaved for surgery. Chester was confined for 6 weeks before being placed in a wild enclosure. He seemed to be progressing well, but as his release date approached, UT veterinarians wanted to examine him before giving him the "all clear" for release. In early November, Chester was transported to UT for radiographs, which revealed more problems with his leg. Chester's release was delay as he had to have a second surgery. Chester now weighed a much healthier 150 lbs. and after returning to ABC, he was once again put in confinement to give his leg every opportunity to heal properly. Chester healed much quicker from his second surgery and in December, was released to the wild enclosure. Without so much as a limp, he darted out of the confinement pen and ran throughout the enclosure. Lisa Stewart described Chester's behavior as "frolicking" and that he was the happiest bear she had ever seen. In order to give Chester every opportunity to recover, the decision was made to keep him over winter and release him in spring. In early April 2005, a 161 lb. Chester was finally released, but this would not be the last ABC would hear of him. By late fall 2004, Kim DeLozier received reports of a bear in an apple tree at The Swag Country Inn in Waynesville, NC. The guests watched in delight as a bear fiercely shook the apple tree until the apples fell to the ground. Then, the bear would lay under the tree and eat till he was full. Although Chester was not becoming a nuisance, his close proximity to people staying at the Inn was a concern; however, after ridding the tree of all its apples, Chester moved on and was never heard from again. Chester's story is a good example of the dedication of our UT veterinarians who take great care of our bears. ABC #62 - Camper On the same day that Chester arrived, another underweight yearling was headed to ABC as well. "Camper" was captured in the park near the Chimneys campground and weighed 27 lbs. upon arrival. The small, male yearling was emaciated and was placed in the pen with the cubs already at ABC. The cubs readily accepted Camper and soon they were all playing, eating, and denning together. Camper quickly gained weight and by mid-September, at 89 lbs., he was ready for release. Camper became internationally known as he was the subject of a study by Chinese biologists who were studying the success of the black bear rehabilitation program in the Smokies. The Chinese biologists, along with personnel from the Memphis Zoo, attended Camper's release on September 15, 2004. Bill Stiver raised the sliding door of the transport crate and Camper returned to his natural home totally unaware that he had played an important role in an international black bear conservation effort. ABC #63 - Ivy In late August, Officer David Brandenburg called about a sow that had been captured by Park officers at Metcalf Bottoms. The underweight bear was found in a ditch eating poison ivy plants and was visibly weak and starved. Upon arrival at ABC, "Ivy" had no apparent physical injuries that would explain her weakened condition, but weighed only 69 lbs, which was far less than the suitable 150 lbs. she should have weighed. Ivy was placed in the enclosure with Chester. She spent a few days resting, eating, and regaining her strength while she became acclimated to her new surroundings. After a brief competition for "squatting rights," Ivy and Chester became friends and were often observed running, resting in the treetops, and foraging together. When Chester had to be confined for his second surgery, the curator discovered that Ivy and Chester had developed their own special vocalizations so they could communicate, even though they were separated. The GSMNP Superintendent at the time, Dale Ditmanson, visited ABC in October and witnessed Ivy displaying normal black bear behavior, but remarked that he had never heard such vocalizations from a black bear. Lisa Stewart described the melodic sounds Ivy used toward Chester as "singing." On a cold day in late December, a healthy 158 lb. Ivy was released. The freezing temperature didn't bother her at all and realizing she had her freedom again, she bolted from the crate and returned to the wild. The year began with Copperfield Bear, named for the magician because he loved to disappear and hide from the curator, but at year's end, it seems all the bears were magicians and, at release, performed their own invdividual disappearing act back into the wild. 2004 was another year that displayed the amazing resilience of the bears who overcame a variety of obstacles, and it also tested the resolve of the curator, wildlife officers, and veterinarians. We will continue our study of ABR's history next weekend. We will also provide updates on our current resident, Hartley Bear throughout the weekend. Thanks to everyone who supported our Valentine auction or attended the tours last weekend.
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Great stories! Each bear is unique and special <3 I admit I would love to see Chester shaking the apple tree and eating the apples!

A book of ABR history with all the bear stories and their pictures from the years would be amazing!

Thank you for sharing the stories of all the young bears that have shaped ABR into the wonderful rescue it is today.

Thank you for sharing this history with us and thank you for helping these beautiful animals

Thank you for posting this history segment!!!

Please keep these coming! 🐻🙏🏻❤️

Love the history and pictures 🐻❤🐻❤

I am really enjoying these stories 💗🐻

Love reading the history of the past years. Thank each of you for all you do for these little Cubbies!💖👏

Wow such a great beginning and story.

Love these stories!

Love these stories!

What a difference in release day now compared to the early years of ABR. So many more people which probably made the bears nervous.

Do you have any way of tracking the bears that you’ve released? I would be heartbroken to never know if they were still doing okay or not - thank you for taking such good care of all these babies

These stories are fascinating !! Thx again for telling them❤️

I hope each of these bears are alive and well in the beautiful wild of the Smokies

This is such fun reading!! Thank you so much for sharing this wonderful history.

I look ad see the crowds watching the releasing. WOW that is a big change, I know it is better.

👏👏👏 The stories of past residents makes wonderful reading. Thank you for the time & trouble it must take. With everyone else they are much appreciated.

So interesting to hear the bear history. Thank you

I enjoy the stories from the past. Thanks for the past bear stories

Loved reading this history. Y'all are doing great work.

Porky(bacon)🐷 😂

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ABR Update-February 16, 2019

Hartley Bear is sleeping in this morning. You’ll notice he’s graduated from his carrier and is sleeping on a bed. He’s eating his formula and his condition seems to be stable. A good thing! We’ve had many questions about his loss of fur; we think it’s attributable to a combination of prolonged malnutrition and intestinal parasites. His fur loss might get worse before it gets better.

Thank you for helping us help Hartley.❤️🐻
appalachianbearrescue.org
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ABR Update-February 16, 2019

Hartley Bear is sleeping in this morning. You’ll notice he’s graduated from his carrier and is sleeping on a bed. He’s eating his formula and his condition seems to be stable. A good thing! We’ve had many questions about his loss of fur; we think it’s attributable to a combination of prolonged malnutrition and intestinal parasites. His fur loss might get worse before it gets better.

Thank you for helping us help Hartley.❤️🐻
http://appalachianbearrescue.org

 

Comment on Facebook

I bet that's the best night's sleep he's had in a very long time. Just rest and get chubbified little fellow

😍😍😍 couldn't wait to see this morning's update....great news. TY ABR

I am so relieved he is ok now! Poor baby he"ll be naked...but his new fur will be healrhy, shiny and fluffy!

Great News!! One step at a time, and he seems to be quickly taking his steps to recovery. Praying for him to have a total recovery. Thank you ABR for taking such good care of him as you have done with all of the babies that have been in your care. <3 🙏

Wow! I am beyond myself! This is the best news I could hear!

Thank you for the update, you just made my day ❤️🐻❤️ Praying for you Hartley. Just keep on eating and resting; you’re in the best place to help you recover!

Keep healing Hartley bear. You are in good hands and many people are praying for you.❤🐻ABR thank you for all you do ❤❤

Hang in there Hartley.

Great update. Looks like the crate is gone. Progress every day. Thank you ABR for all that you do!!!

Hang on lil dude, you're in great hands.

What a brave strong sweet boy!!! I was afraid to check Facebook to be honest. ABR, please update us again later today. I don’t think I can stand to wait until tomorrow to hear how he’s doing.

Ty for the update ! Prayers 🙏 for Hartley! He is in great hands and care😊

Another day, keep fighting Hartley we're all praying for you, 💕

So very glad to see this post! So he decided to move to the new spot on his own? I hope he continues to do well!!!! Praying for the little boy!

I think about his developing brain. Does anyone know if he possibly could suffer brain damage due to malnutrition?

Woop woop Hartley!! And ABR 😁💚🐻 o know it's been asked before...but how do the Cubs get their name...I know some are circumstance... just curious... if you're busy you dont have to answer...

Appalachian Bear Rescue Do bears get mange? I know young dogs with a weakened immune system can get demodectic mange. I hope Hartley continues to improve. He is certainly in the absolute best hands.

Where is Mommy Bunny?

Is this the smallest bear you’ve taken in for their age?

Abscesses. Do we know a cause or is it a low immune system issue? An inquiring mind wants to know😬

Hopefully since he is young maybe he can recover and hopefully no damage to the brain. Or if there is maybe it can heal. After reading, I assume he doesnt need ivs

Will the crate go back in? I’d think it would be a health benefit at this stage. A happy bear becomes a healthy bear 😁

Is there a possibility that Hartley's hair will not grow back? He looks so pitiful to see him now. But I am so happy he is settling down. With your loving care, he will soon be gaining weight and looking so much better.

I think they want to keep him wild but I wondered about why they chose not to give ivs

Do you put medication in his food, to combat the intestinal parasites?

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ABR Update #3 February 15, 2019

We promise this will be the last update for today. We thought you'd like to know that Hartley came out of his carrier and started climbing. Also, he produced much poops! (Curator Tom, who is on night duty, thanks Hartley for that.) This doesn't mean Hartley is out of the woods yet, but it does mean he might move to roomier quarters sooner than expected. You can see the extent of his fur loss, so he needs to be kept warm and dry. One day at a time.🤞

Our special Hartley Adoption Packages have SOLD OUT! We'll introduce a new package on Monday. Thank you so much for your support. ❤️🐻
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ABR Update #3 February 15, 2019

We promise this will be the last update for today. We thought youd like to know that Hartley came out of his carrier and started climbing. Also, he produced much poops! (Curator Tom, who is on night duty,  thanks Hartley for that.) This doesnt mean Hartley is out of the woods yet, but it does mean he might move to roomier quarters sooner than expected. You can see the extent of his fur loss, so he needs to be kept warm and dry. One day at a time.🤞

Our special Hartley Adoption Packages have SOLD OUT! Well introduce a new package on Monday. Thank you so much for your support. ❤️🐻

 

Comment on Facebook

I am seriously stalking this page because I wanna know how he is....PLEASE keep the updates coming. Continued baby bear prayers and prayers for all caregivers as well

Never too many updates! Thank you - keep 'em coming. (And this bear mom wondered about his output. Glad to know he's being a good bear in the woods. 😉)

You could update hourly and I'd be fine with it. I hope and pray Hartley can pull through and have a long life. ❤🙏🙏❤

Never apologize for good news like this!!! Yay Hartley!!!

Precious baby!! Thank you for the update! I am heartsick over his condition and what he has endured over these last few months. I pray he makes it so he can have another chance at a good life. Thank you ABR for all you do ! Your work is a bright spot in this gloomy world.

Poor sweet baby. Will be saying endless prayers for you baby boy. Sending so much ❤️ love.

- Finally got something in that little tummy so he could poop. Poor little guy, how confused he must be.

Some one needs to knit or sew that little guy a coat! 😁 And I agree, no such thing as to many updates. We are ALL stalking... waiting for good news

Updates are wonderful and appreciated, but ABR's first priority is Hartley! Way to go Hartley!!

Post all ya want. I love y’all and those critters

Please don’t stop the updates!!! Praying for Hartley

Cubby poops. It's a good thing. Keep up the good work, little Hartley!

God bless you all for doing all you can to save this baby ❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤

Keep the updates coming. I think I'm not the only obsessed with this little fighter

Love Sweet Hartley updates, he definitely is a fighter ...poor baby he looks so naked and cold, but I am sure within no time his fur will grow back 🙏🏼🙏🏼🙏🏼❤️🐻

Beyond words with happiness and joy for Hartley!!!

keep fighting Hartley, we are praying for you.

I assume the little guy is in a warm area and has a source of nutrients. How does this combined with his poor state affect what should be his period of torpor? Know you need some rest, though seems no one objects to updates.

Oh awesome news! This makes me so happy! I just donated for Hartley!!! Get well little one! We’re all cheering for you!! 😘❤️

Update all you want about the sweet baby. He needs a sweater, but that would probably go against contact rules...

Glad his solid plumbing tract is working! Is he urinating?

Poor baby ., what made him loose his fur ?

ABR, why, do you suppose he got in the condition he is in?

So glad to hear this and eager for the next update! I’m checking in every couple of hours to see how he is doing! Will you have more adoption packages with the shirts soon? Didn’t have my size so I just donated some money but would love to also purchase the shirt

Is his fur loss due to malnutrition?

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ABR Update #2-February 15, 2019

Hartley Bear is holding his own. Curator Tom reports our 12-pound yearling ate most of the formula at his last feeding and is sleeping between feedings. Rest is probably the best thing for him. Judging from his condition, this might be the first time in weeks that Hartley has been warm, dry and fed. He can sleep as long as he wishes. Dr. Ramsey would like to see Hartley in a week to check on his progress. If our bear is strong enough, the curator will take him to UT. Otherwise, the vets might have to make a house call or the curators could arrange a virtual examination via webcam, whatever is best for our bear. It seems Hartley doesn’t have mange; there were no mites present in the skin scrapings and he isn’t scratching. He’s not leaving his carrier either; he pokes his head out, laps up his formula, then pulls his head back in, like a turtle retreating into his shell.

We don’t know why Hartley is without his mother; at his age (13 months) and at this time of year, he should still be with her in their den. Hypothermia and dehydration can kill a young bear quicker than starvation and it is a wonder he survived on his own for this long.

We’re touched by your generosity and compassion for Hartley. We wish there was a way to let him know how many people are on his side, encouraging him to take another breath and live another day. We are proud to call you our friends. Thank you.❤️🐻

We’ll post another update tomorrow.

appalachianbearrescue.org/
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ABR Update #2-February 15, 2019

Hartley Bear is holding his own. Curator Tom reports our 12-pound yearling ate most of the formula at his last feeding and is sleeping between feedings. Rest is probably the best thing for him. Judging from his condition, this might be the first time in weeks that Hartley has been warm, dry and fed. He can sleep as long as he wishes.  Dr. Ramsey would like to see Hartley in a week to check on his progress. If our bear is strong enough, the curator will take him to UT. Otherwise, the vets might have to make a house call or the curators could arrange a virtual examination via webcam, whatever is best for our bear.  It seems Hartley doesn’t have mange; there were no mites present in the skin scrapings and he isn’t scratching. He’s not leaving his carrier either; he pokes his head out, laps up his formula, then pulls his head back in, like a turtle retreating into his shell. 

We don’t know why Hartley is without his mother; at his age (13 months) and at this time of year, he should still be with her in their den. Hypothermia and dehydration can kill a young bear quicker than starvation and it is a wonder he survived on his own for this long.

We’re touched by your generosity and compassion for Hartley. We wish there was a way to let him know how many people are on his side, encouraging him to take another breath and live another day. We are proud to call you our friends. Thank you.❤️🐻

We’ll post another update tomorrow. 

http://appalachianbearrescue.org/

 

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"He’s not leaving his carrier either; he pokes his head out, laps up his formula, then pulls his head back in, like a turtle retreating into his shell." What would you do if you were captured by extra-terrestrials? ;)

This is what I have been thinking, that finally he is dry, warm, has food and shelter after God knows how much time. I feel that he wants to live and he knows he has a chance.

I see the arrows are on the job! If they say "Hartley's future shredding project", then I say YES!!!! Even the arrows believe he will be up and about soon, causing curators to lose or turn gray their hair over his antics! Sleep, eat, be a temporary travel crate turtle if you must, Hartley Bear. Your body repairs itself while it sleeps. Keep on keeping on.

Every minute eating & resting is precious for Hartley! So glad he feels safe enough to rest in the carrier for now. Poor thing has been through an awful time!

This little dude has been on my mind all day. Sending prayers & positive vibes his way!

Poor little bear! At least he is warm, dry, fed, and safe now. No matter what happens from here, he won't have to face it alone. <3

I got on facebook just to see if there was an update on this little bear.

So happy to know he continues to eat🍼 then sleep, that is a great sign. Rest up😴and relax🛌now little Hartley, you have the best team to help with all of your needs now and a lot of bear lovers pullin for you❤️🐻

Each minute, each hour, each feeding, each looking out to see, is a miracle. Rock our world, little bear! We're all pulling for you.

His carrier makes an excellent substitute den.

He may not realise how much he is loved but he understands warmth, dry and food <3

Keep going Hartley Bear!! You’ve got so many cheerleaders rooting and praying for you. 💖🐻💖

Eat and sleep are your only jobs now Hartley Bear!

Such wonderful news! Thank you!

Thank you for once again for being the hope for what would have been a hopeless little bear.

So glad Hartley is holding his own and in ABR’s good care! Any speculation on the cause of his hair loss? Poor little cubby, rest and recover & heal little one.

I just have a feeling Hartley Bear is going to make it, he wants to live. Positive thoughts for a full recovery. 💖

Hang in there, Hartley! And bless all those who are caring for him. ❤️

Hang in there little guy!! You can make it!

Does she have an IV for fluids? Poor wee one. Mother bunny while she is weak?

Thank you for that update! I hate to think this but maybe Hartley has frostbite? Poor baby. I sure do hate to think of him being out in the cold and damp.

If he doesn’t have mites or mange, what is causing the alopecia? Malnutrition?

I missed your post about Hartley. When did he come to ABR? I hope he has sister bunny to cuddle with. At 12 lbs. how could he survive in the cold wild that small at his age? I’m so glad you have him at ABR. ❤️❤️

Is he going “potty” in his crate?

Do you believe he is too weak to leave his carrier or is he finding comfort in it? I imagine if he continues to stay in there you'll be forced to open it for cleaning. So happy he's made it another day.

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Appalachian Bear Rescue (ABR) is a black bear rescue facility located just outside of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park in Townsend, Tennessee. ABR is a nonprofit, tax-exempt organization that has been returning black bears back to the wild since 1996. Each year black bears from our national parks and surrounding areas are orphaned, injured, or in need of medical care. Thanks to Appalachian Bear Rescue, these bears are given a second chance at life in the wild.

 Come visit us at our Visitor & Education Center at Trillium Cove!

Trillium Cove Shopping Center off East Lamar Alexander Parkway on Highway 321 in Townsend.

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