1 hour ago

Appalachian Bear Rescue

ABR Update-May 22, 2018 Cubby Birthday Fundraiser!

Help us help your favorite cubs return to the wild where they belong.

We chose January 22 as the “official” birthday for all our resident bears because it falls mid-way in the range of possible birthdates, early January to early February. We celebrate Cubby Birthday every month because each one is an important milestone on our residents’ journey back to the wild.

Viola and Clementine are four months old today, and Magnolia is sixteen months. All over North America, black bears the same age as Magnolia, are starting life on their own. Bear family break-up has begun and yearlings will have to make their own way in the world. Viola and Clementine should still be with their mothers, but we’ll do our best to help them grow into big little bears. With your help, we’ll give our three residents a second chance at life in the wild. Happy Birthday, bears!
... See MoreSee Less

ABR Update-May 22, 2018 Cubby Birthday Fundraiser! 

Help us help your favorite cubs return to the wild where they belong.

We chose January 22 as the “official” birthday for all our resident bears because it falls mid-way in the range of possible birthdates, early January to early February. We celebrate Cubby Birthday every month because each one is an important milestone on our residents’ journey back to the wild.  

Viola and Clementine are four months old today, and Magnolia is sixteen months. All over North America, black bears the same age as  Magnolia, are starting life on their own. Bear family break-up has begun and yearlings will have to make their own way in the world. Viola and Clementine should still be with their mothers, but we’ll do our best to help them grow into big little bears. With your help, we’ll give our three residents a second chance at life in the wild. Happy Birthday, bears!

 

Comment on Facebook

Happy Birthday bears. My bday is this month and I did a fund raiser for ABR. Hope this makes their life a little bit better.

🎉 Happy Birthday to all of the precious bears!

21 hours ago

Appalachian Bear Rescue

A few hours ago, we received rescued bear #270. The bear, a female yearling from Louisiana, is almost 16 months old and weighs 25 pounds. The bear was seen several times feeding on spilled corn within a hog corral and appeared underweight. Following protocol, the TWRA was contacted and they granted permission to transport the bear from Louisiana to ABR. Hank Atkins, a wildlife officer, made the 12-hour trip to bring her to our facility. The bear had been examined by a vet in Louisiana before making the journey to Tennessee, so a visit to UT Vet School was deemed unnecessary. She seems in good health, but undernourished. She may have been separated from her mother for weeks and wasn’t doing well on her own.

Bear #270 is currently in Acclimation Pen #1, dining on Mazouri Bear Diet Pellets, blueberries, grapes, and pears. If all goes well, she’ll be released to Wild Enclosure #1 to complete her recovery. Bear #270 is a Louisiana Black Bear (Ursus americanus lutelousa), a sub-species of the American Black Bear and the state mammal of Louisiana. Louisiana black bears have longer and narrower skulls than other black bears. Please welcome, Magnolia Bear.

Magnolia, Clementine and Viola Bear are available for adoption. Please click on the link below. ❤️🐻🐻🐻

salsa4.salsalabs.com/o/51586/t/19338/shop/item.jsp?storefront_KEY=334&t=&store_item_KEY=1070
... See MoreSee Less

 

Comment on Facebook

Would she not have been naturally separated from her mothers some times ago. Are bears from out of state checked carefully for odd diseases before bringing them to TN? I hope you realize she will need hot sauce with her bear pellets.

Wow! The Sisterhood of the Bears! I thought you had named her "Magnolia" for Louisiana's nickname but "Magnolia" is Mississippi's nickname. Close enough. As long as she's safe, which she is, she'll soon be healthy enough to resume life in the wild. Thanks to all had a hand in her rescue.

Welcome Hank and Magnolia! Am curious as to how Louisiana authorities decided to send Magnolia to ABR? Is there a list of bear rescue facilities and/or a protocol for different states to follow on where to send bears in need?

OK...dumb question of the week...I realize there are probably wonderful reasons for this, but wouldn't it have been less stressful for little Magnolia (and those accompanying her) to fly her there? If tigers and eagles can be transported in our planes, not to mention very large pups, why not a bear?

Welcome, Magnolia Bear! So, you guys are basically going to teach her how to forage and find the proper food on her own? Otherwise, she would be back to square one.

Lucky you Magnolia, you are in the best place ever and will receive only the best care and unending yummy food. I assume she will be returned to Louisiana when she is ready?

Curious, Has April Bear been released? Did I miss something?

Awww Magnolia.....you don’t know it and will never understand it but you are in the best place and best hands there are. Lil Clementine has captured her tree says the red arrow....and precious Viola is soaking her nubbin...what more can a bear ask for?? ❤️❤️❤️

Is Magnolia the first Louisiana bear y'all have cared for?

Welcome Magnolia Bear! I can promise you ABR will do everything in their power to help you become a big, healthy yearling in no time. Be a good bear and eat all your food, don't be picky. ABR will get you back home as soon as they can do so for your safety. Thank you, ABR and your team, for being there for any black bear cubs or yearlings that might need help. Y'all are wonderful.

Welcome little Magnolia Bear! So small for a yearling, but you'll soon get chubby like the other ABR bears! Thank you to Louisiana wildlife officers and TWRA for making this possible, and especially to Hank Atkins for making the long drive to help this little girl. If, course, many, many thanks to ABR just for being there and willing to help.

How much should a yearling normally weigh?

Thank you to officer Hank Atkins for making the 12 hour trip to give this bear a chance at life back in the wild. ABR, we know Magnolia Bear has the best chance to survive and thrive back in her home turf after her rehabilitation stay. Thank you for all you do.

Will she be returned to LA when it is time for release?

Release her in the Magnolia State of Mississippi!

Thank God she has arrived & is not sickly. You will get het to her release weight in no time & she can go back to her home. You all are so amazing with the work you do to save our beautiful Cubs. Thank you & job well done as always. Welcome Miss Magnolia. ❤️🐻

Hi, Magnolia! Eat up, girl. It's a virtual smorgasbord of good for you bear food. And the best bed and breakfast with room service you'll find anywhere!

Definitely the year of female black bear. Welcome Magnolia Bear!!!! You are now in the place where the help you need is indeed available. Happy ABR will provide for your needs and return you to the wild where you belong. Looking forward to following you while you are at ABR.

Welcome Magnolia 🐻! Your job should you decide to take it is EAT, EAT,EAT. Grow fat and strong and let all your friends in Louisiana know about ABR and what a nice time you are having there.

Welcome Magnolia Bear. I love the name!! Isn't 16 months about the usual time of family break up?

Is Louisiana the farthest away you have received a bear from?

Oh Magnolia, I'm so glad you are at ABR after your ordeal. You are at the best place for loving care and recovery until you are well enough to return to the forest. You are in good company and will love the good food you are about to receive plenty of. And you will get to share bendy arrows with us too! We love you, Magnolia bear.

Welcome little Magnolia bear. You are safe now and will get all the food you need. Eat up and get healthy!! Love you already.

Omg, so exciting!!!! The first thing I do is scroll to see the new baby's name, THEN I read the rescue story!! 💜🧡💛💚 Welcome Miss Magnolia from Louisiana!

Will she be released back in Louisiana?

+ View more comments

ABR Video Update-May 21, 2018

*This video is best viewed in full screen.

Appalachian Bear Rescue’s Lead Curator, Coy Blair, has been working on his GPS collar study of 42 former bear residents released between 2015 and 2017. The study forms the core of his master’s thesis. To gauge ABR's ability to successfully rehabilitate and release bears, Coy focused this study on survival and spatial ecology during the first year after release. The study also serves to narrow the knowledge gap surrounding the rehabilitation and release of black bears.

On March 26, 2018, Coy presented a brief overview of his preliminary findings at the 5th International Human-Bear Conflicts Workshop held in Gatlinburg. In his overview presentation, Coy summarized over 2 years of tracking data in a 15-minute time slot. Recently, Curator Coy recorded this overview presentation to share with our Facebook friends. The full study will be published later this year.
Most bears in Coy’s study wore their collars for a full year after release. Some bears managed to drop their collars before the one-year mark. Curator Coy reports that 4 bears did not survive a full year post-release. Statistical programs crunched the numbers and made projections for bears that did not keep their collars for a full year. The statistical survival rate one year post-release for bears in Coy's study is 88.5%, far better than we expected. His study shows the chance of survival increased with the age of the bear at release: the older the bear at release, the higher the survival probability.

Conflict management examined if our former residents were more likely to engage in activities that led to human-bear conflict. Were they more prone to raiding trash or approaching humans? Of the 42 bears in the study 7 bears were from mothers known to have had a history of conflict. Of those 7, 3 did have problems within one year post-release, but 4 did not. None of the bears descended from mothers with no known history of conflict engaged in conflict activity one year post-release. We can likely infer that ABR didn’t do anything to contribute to an increased propensity for our former residents to raid trash or approach humans.

Coy’s study confirmed some facts that we’ve known about our bears in the southern Appalachians. Our bears generally prefer to den in trees. Coy found it interesting that female bears in his study traveled further in the landscape than did the male bears. In the wild, black bear mothers are more tolerant of female offspring living in their home range. We strive to release bears as close to their places of origin as possible. However, there is no guarantee that we release females directly into their mother's home range. Perhaps these females are forced to compete for territory just as sub-adult males do in the wild.

We’ve always known our intervention increased the lifespan of our resident bears; most would have died had it not been for ABR. However, we didn’t know if anything we did REDUCED their lifespan after they left us. The rate of mortality for cubs and yearlings in the wild is high: about 50% of cubs don’t make it through their first year. The rate is about 25-30% for yearlings. We never expected a 100% survival rate for our former residents; we would have been satisfied if it matched the natural mortality rate, indicating we weren’t doing anything that reduced the survival rate below what it would be in the wild. We are thrilled with an 88.5% one-year post-release survival rate.
www.youtube.com/watch?v=eUVPqAlur3k*This video is best viewed in full screen. Appalachian Bear Rescue’s Lead Curator, Coy Blair, has been working on his GPS collar study of 42 former bear resi...
... See MoreSee Less

Video image

 

Comment on Facebook

Really interesting! If I see a video of a bear in the Smokys or surrounding area, I find myself looking for ear tags. Does anyone else?

Actually glad we dont know who perished...glad most did well. Thank you Curator Coy

So interesting!!! I'm already sad about the 4 bears that we lost (one was Aster Bear) but that seems to be a super survival rate. ABR does great work, and now we have science to prove it!

Wonderful report! Will we ever know by name or number what happened to individual bears? Will there be a place where we can look them up? I want to know about Marvin, Finnegan, Carter, Andy and Eliza, Noli, Milo, etc. I hope the 2 from the Parkway in NC are well although they wouldn’t be in the study.

Of the bears that died in the first year, was it attributable to human causes?

Is survival rate greater than that of the normal population a goal? Is there any drawback to doing the job too well?

This is fantastic news and fantastic research! I love seeing the organizations I donate to really looking to understand their impact and assessing the effectiveness of their services! Congratulations to ABP and to Curator Coy!!!

Kudos to the ABR & Curator Coy. Its pretty tough to get the cubs to come back for follow-up checkups & interviews. This is a great way to go a few steps further to gauge the results of all your hard work. Most would be happy to foster the cubs until they are ready to be released, not knowing how they faired in the wild. I hope you can do more studies & tracking to gain additional knowledge.

This is fantastic!! Brought tears of joy to my eyes confirming (and beyond) what we all hoped. So happy to support such a wonderful organization. I wish I could give you a “rescue” medal!!!

Awesome......great information and outstanding job by Curator Coy. Looking forward to the release of his completed study! Also very happy and proud of the high survival rate of your bears. Indicates the great care you take for all...both in rehab and release.....

Thank you for sharing your research with us, Coy. An 88.5% survival rate is wonderful! But I also wish it were 100%. Makes me sad to think that 4 of your bears are no longer with us. ABR does such an incredible job with these cubs. Hearing that you are making a difference is so great. Thank you all for taking care of these little ones!

Thank you for both the video and summary of Curator Coy's findings. It was very interesting reading and I am so happy for you, and the surviving past residents, that the one-year post-release survival rate was so high!!! A true acknowledgement of how well you go about rehabilitating the orphaned bears that are lucky enough to come to you! Congratulations Curator Coy on your research. 💖

Really shows how quickly cubs learn the trash can/people equals food and how dangerous cars are to bears. I too am very happy at the survival rate, that's amazing. You all are doing the right thing! It's of course sad to hear of deaths, but those cubs got a second chance at life, something they would have never gotten without you and the donors. Big hugs to Coy for doing the project and for everyone involved in helping these marvelous animals.

Really enjoyed reading about the study results. I know you work very hard on this study, especially retrieving collars.

Congrats to Coy and everyone at ABR for proving they build a better bear 😀

Wow....however 💔💔💔💔 Sorry, can’t help it. But those statistics are wonderful!

That's great! Well-done, Curator Coy and ABR!

Very interesting!!! Grest news and information. The survival rate is fantastic!!! ❤❤❤

Congratulations, Coy. Your study is interesting and extremely useful. I wish I had been on your committee. 🙂

Very interesting report from Curator Coy.

Wonderful, hopeful news.

Thank you for the information.

ABR is amazing!!!!! 🐻🧡

Great work and what interesting information!!!

Very interesting!! Thank you!

+ View more comments

2 days ago

Appalachian Bear Rescue

Clementine has too much energy! ... See MoreSee Less

 

Comment on Facebook

Best case scenario - when do you think Clem & Viola might be able to get together?

I have not had any posts on fb. They dropped you for some reason. X uk

Have you ever observed cubs trying to interact with the fake painted scenery in the cub house? What is the most amusing thing you have ever observed a cub doing?😊

Does she feel trapped ? Or is it just playful energy? X uk

Did anyone get to see the very end of cbs Sunday morning show today? They aired an adorable clip of a mama bear and her cubs in Yellowstone Park. The cubs were racing up and down a tree

I can see why she might have fallen in the river.

It’s raining right now and we have Victoria and Albert the mallards and a male turkey and two females in the driveway eating poultry food and seeds right now.

Coy needs to build her a baby bear jungle gym to play on! LOL! ♥️🐻🐾

I am not sure how many siblings, if any, Clemetine had, but even if she was an only child, her mom had her paws full and that's how she ended up in the river! Glad I am not the bear-sitter.

God help the saplings when this little girl gets outside!

I followed Fennigan on here to. Hope he's doing well.

Ohhhh!!! She’s gonna find the bear diet and throw it out of her bowl 😂😂😂😂

Better reinforce the delicate saplings before she enters the wild enclosure

Are her honey and food logs in the pen? Can’t quite see😋😋

She gives new meaning to “rough and tumble”

Looks like a bearnado went thru her pen!

She’s so fast! I never saw her go to the other side

Sorry I missed the little tree wrestler 🤣🤣🤣🎀💖🐻🌲🌲she is too funny, such a little busy bee 🐻🐝Nice to see Viola doing so much better and actually really enjoying her spacious cub house with all its wonderful amenities 🎀💖🐻🏠😃😃😃

Hi from Indiana, love watching and seeing these babies grow! This one is sure active, that’s good would whether see that than sick or hurt. Keep up the good work you are doing ABR I am so glad that give these babies a second chance to be big, wild bears 🐻

Took me almost a minute to figure out that the tree blowing in the breeze was actually Miss Clementine Bear climbing in the tree! So good to see her playing and being a cub!

Hi from Chicago! My son and I love watching! It’s fun to see how much puppy-like behavior she shows. Very playful and easily distracted! We love her!

She really is a bundle of energy, only just tuned in and seen the destruction in her pen. The tree has really taken some punishment and looks as if she hurled her food all over the floor. Did she object to its content???

Can't wait to get home from eating out after church for this treat ....Thank you so much Curator Janet

I appreciate that it isn't my job to clean up after her. What a mess! But she is enjoying every minute....

Do bears clean themselves, like a cat, after eating or would her Mother do that while she is a baby?

+ View more comments

Load more